Classic Inlines
603 W Pecos Ave
Mesa, AZ 85210


 
Autolite 1100-1V Installation Instructions

Carburetor Installation

1)
Install the gasket, carb studs, any applicable spacers, the carburetor, and the nuts. Tighten the nuts gently and uniformly and torque to 10-15 lbs. Do not over tighten, as this could warp the carb base, resulting in a vacuum leak.
2)
Connect throttle linkage or cable, and the transmission kick-down linkage if applicable.
3)
Install a NEW fuel filter, either at the carb, or on the fuel pump ('65 and earlier).
4)
Connect the fuel line to the fuel filter, fuel pump, and/or the carb. Use teflon tape on the threads, and/or new rubber hoses and new clamps, which helps to prevent leaks.
5)
Install the automatic hot air choke tube, either stock or an aftermarket tube if you have headers. Classic Inlines offers an extra long hot air choke tube for headers.
6)
Start the engine and check for leaks (both fuel and vacuum). If you see a fuel leak, shut the engine down immediately and correct the problem. It's a good idea to have a fire extinguisher on hand just in case you have a fire. Make sure it's rated for fuel fires.
7)
Check ignition timing and/or set the timing before you attempt any carb adjustments.

Initial Timing Instructions

The number one problem concerning engine driveability is ignition timing. The reason for this is two fold. Most guys use a timing light to set their timing, and they set it according to the specs in their service manual. Unfortunately timing lights are not reliable. Why, because a lot of guys use their old balancer, instead of replacing it. Many older balancers have a rubber ring that was pressed into place, between the inner and outer rings. Over time, these rubber rings dry out, causing the outer ring to slip. When this happens, the timing marks move, there-by making it impossible to use a timing light. The other reason, in theory, is that all Ford engines of that time period, run better, deliver more power, and get better gas mileage, when the ignition timing is advanced beyond factory specifications. As such, we recommend the following procedures for setting your timing. The only tools required are a 1/2" wrench, a good set of ears, and the ability to hear the engine ping.

1)
First loosen the bolt on the distributor hold down clamp using a 1/2" wrench, being careful not to turn the distributor. Make sure the bolt is loose enough to rotate the distributor by hand, but snug enough to prevent the distributor from turning freely.
2)
Start the engine and make sure it idles on it's own (see Starting Instructions below). Adjust the idle speed screw on the carburetor if needed. Note: It is assumed that the distributor is in the correct position, and that the engine was running and holding an idle before you installed the rebuilt carb. If the engine doesn't start, or if it won't idle, you'll need to trouble-shoot the problem accordingly (make sure its getting fuel, has a spark, and so on). If your not sure how to do this, refer to your Ford Service Manual.
3)
With the engine at idle, turn the distributor counter-clockwise (advancing the timing) until it runs the fastest, but no further. Don't worry, if you go to far the engine will start to run rough, telling you that you went to far. Simply turn it back to where it was and start over. Again, advance the timing until the engine run the fastest, then stop.
4)
Snug down the 1/2" bolt and take the car out for a test drive. Make sure you take the wrench with you. If the engine "PINGS" under acceleration or when going up a hill (under load), loosen the bolt and turn the distributor clockwise, but just a tad. Keep doing this until the pinging stops, then tighten the bolt. Basically, you want to set the timing so the engine is very close to pinging, but doesn't.
5)
That's it, at least for now..... Now you're ready to adjust the carburetor.

Carb Adjustments

There are only three things that need to be adjusted on the carb, the choke, idle mixture, and idle speed. All three adjustments are very simple to do. However, before we explain how to adjust these settings, we should explain how the choke works.... The choke coil, when cold, provides just enough tension to close the choke plate, then gradually opens the choke plate when an internal coil is heated. The choke un-loader, by use of manifold vacuum, instantly opens the choke plate when the engine is started, but just a little bit. As the engine warms up, the choke coil will continue to open the choke plate, gradually opening it until the choke plate is in a fully opened position. As for the choke adjustments, there are two variables that effect cold starting, the climate and the engines condition. An engine in a warm climate requires a slightly different choke adjustment, than the same engine in a cold climate. A healthier engine also has more manifold vacuum, which may require a minor change in the choke adjustment. As such, there are two adjustments that may be required, one to the choke coil, and the other to the choke un-loader. The choke coil can be adjusted in the field, however the choke un-loader should only be adjusted by a qualified technician.

1)
To adjust the choke coil, start with a cold engine. Press the throttle pedal to the floor, then release it. The choke plate should be fully closed. Loosen all three screws and rotate the black choke cap, first clockwise until it opens, then counter-clockwise until it just barely closes. The idea is to get just enough tension to close the choke plate, but no more. Note: if the choke plate doesn't close completely, the engine will be hard to start when cold. If there is too much tension, the engine will stay on fast idle too long.
2)
To adjust the idle speed, start by warming up the engine. Once the normal operating temperature is reach, use a tachometer and adjust the idle speed screw until the engine idles at it's slowest speed. For most motors, this will be around 700-800 rpm. For performance motors, it will be around 800-1000 rpm, depending on the cam profile.
3)
The last adjustment is the idle mixture screw. Turn the mixture screw clockwise (in) until the engine starts to slow down. Then turn the mixture screw counter-clockwise (out) to obtain the maximum speed. While a tach is helpful, this can be done by ear.

Final Adjustments

1)
If you have a vacuum gauge, adjust the timing one more time, to archive the highest manifold vacuum possible at idle. Once this is done, take the car out for another test drive. If it pings, turn the distributor clockwise just a tad and retest. Again, you want to set the timing so the engine is very close to pinging, but doesn't. Oh yea... don't forget to snug the distributor bolt down when your done.
2)
The last step is to re-adjust the idle mixture screw to archive the maximum rpm's, and the highest manifold vacuum reading. When your finish, the engine should be running at peak efficiency.

Fuel Recommendations

We highly recommend the use of premium fuel in your six cylinder engine. Premium fuels have a higher octane rating which does a better job controlling pre-ignition and detonation, also called pinging. If you use a premium fuel, you can advance the ignition timing a tad bit further, there-by increasing both power and mileage.

Starting Instructions

1)
Press the throttle pedal all the way to the floor. This allows the choke plate to close.
2)
Pump the throttle pedal once or twice, to get a little fuel into the carb and manifold.
3)
Depress the throttle pedal half way to the floor, then start the engine.
4)
Once the engine fires, take your foot off the throttle pedal and let it idle.
5)
After the engine has been running for 20-30 seconds, tap the throttle pedal. This will set the fast idle cam on the second step, so the engine runs a little slower. That's it.

Miscellaneous Notes

A stock six cylinder engine, with a stock camshaft, should have approximately 20 inches of manifold vacuum (lower with a performance camshaft), and it should idle at 700-800 rpm (higher with a performance camshaft).


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