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color 170

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Guest

color 170

Post #1 by Guest » Sat Nov 16, 2002 6:04 am

what color should the 170 have in a 61 falcon?


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Falcon62
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Post #2 by Falcon62 » Sat Nov 16, 2002 10:07 am

Welcome to the forums!

The correct color for the 170 is black with an orange valve cover. Here's how I painted mine in my '62:

Image

I also painted the thermostat housing the same color as the valve cover, but don't believe it is factory correct.
Phil, USAF Retired
'61 Futura 2dr
'62 Sports Futura, 200/C4
ASE Master Re-Certified Collision & Refinishing Technician

dwood

Post #3 by dwood » Sat Nov 16, 2002 10:50 am

just as the picture shows it should be orange. I believe just the valve cover should be orange as stated for period correctness, but paint it as you would like it!

Darin

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Post #4 by Guest » Sat Nov 16, 2002 7:33 pm

Look's nice, Phil. I painted my block dark ford blue and the valve cover/air cleaner orange or "ford red". Is there some kind of clear coat you can spray on to help keep the paint from fading? What starts out as ford red turns into a C%#!y orange within a short time of regular use. I like the color combo I have, but if I can't find something to make the red keep looking fresh I'll go to another color combo when I build my 200 - probably black valve cover/blue block. All blue is too boring, and the chrome valve cover /blue block combo looks nice, but like tork thrusts wheels is getting a bit too common. That is, common as far as ford sixes are concerned :wink:

Thor

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addo
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Post #5 by addo » Sat Nov 16, 2002 8:45 pm

Thor,

Just get it sprayed with good old urethane. Auto paint will cop a fair bit of heat and spillage. Acrylic won't. And enamel ages, like you said.

I second you on the chrome becoming common. Good paint says you've paid attention. Chrome just says you've paid money.

Cheers, Adam.

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Post #6 by Falcon62 » Sat Nov 16, 2002 8:55 pm

Hehe, I like color under the hood. 8) That's why my headers are black instead of chrome. I tried to keep the look on the engine as close to "period correct" as possible, but discerning eyes will note the brass freeze plugs. :roll:

I have to agree with Addo, spraying the valve cover with urethane should keep it color true and long lasting. Maybe by summer I'll have enough time logged at the local CC to spray my own parts and not kill myself in the process. :wink:
Phil, USAF Retired
'61 Futura 2dr
'62 Sports Futura, 200/C4
ASE Master Re-Certified Collision & Refinishing Technician

Guest

Post #7 by Guest » Thu Nov 21, 2002 3:29 am

Do you guys mean a clear urethane over the ford color paint, or use a colored urethane paint? BTW- I am using engine paint.

"Auto paint will cop a fair bit of heat and spillage. Acrylic won't"

I'm rusty on my Aussie slang- I think "cop" down under means something differant than say, to "cop" a feel :lol: You are saying acrylic will handle heat and spillage better? That'd be cool as even antifreeze stains the ford blue paint around my leaky freeze plugs :wink:

Thor

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Post #8 by addo » Thu Nov 21, 2002 4:56 am

Thorski, By "Auto paint", I was meaning solid colour urethane. Properly prepped and applied, this will take (= "cop") a fair bit of fluids (not brake fluid), like oil, grease, coolant, and withstand heat pretty well. Acrylic is a very old-hat paint now (introduced 1957), far outperformed by urethane in most applications. Enamel is even older, and has limited uses - you have exposed some of its shortcomings.

You will have to fully strip the current engine enamel, and use a proprietary rust treatment on the bare iron/steel prior to laydown. Some guys spray the colour straight over the metal, but I suggest a very thin layer of tinted "wet-on-wet" primer; this will actually assist the bonding.

The whole finish should be thin - it will not be buffed like the outside, and the thicker the paint, the more internal stresses as it dries fully. Keep it "lean and mean".

Yeah - sounds like a lot of work! Think of it as practice for the parts detailing that will really set your car off...

Regards, Adam.

Guest

Post #9 by Guest » Thu Nov 21, 2002 9:44 pm

Adam,

No problemo- you don't have to convice me on the merits of a well detailed engine bay. Mine is very well detailed- the engine looks better than it runs! I'm not familiar with wet on wet primer- does that mean you give it a second coat while it's still wet, or is it a special kind of primer?

Thor

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Post #10 by addo » Fri Nov 22, 2002 3:24 am

It's the type of primers that you don't sand. They vary in thickness (and hence hiding ability). The idea is that they are a good intermediary between the surface and the topcoat, where a sanding type primer is not wanted or needed.

I don't know what yours would be called, but our PPG one is called "wet-on-wet"... Maybe the stuff you guys call sealer could be the same, or equivalent. They ususally can be topcoated after about 20 minutes dry time, and will cure hard after eight or so if not topped. Then you have to sand them. :roll: And re-prime.

You can often tint them, too. The benefits here are obvious.

Guest

Post #11 by Guest » Fri Nov 22, 2002 2:20 pm

I"m confused- I thought you said that you don't sand them? Either way, I'm a spray can man so if it is not available in a rattle can I'll use something else.

Thor

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Post #12 by Falcon62 » Fri Nov 22, 2002 8:12 pm

No worries Thor. You won't be getting any urethane in rattle cans. Although, I have heard that some jobbers can put custom colors in rattle cans. I don't think you would find any urethane due to the catalyst (hardener) required.

I'm pretty new at this, but the once you add the catalyst, you only have so much time before the paint "cures" on its own. Also, when spraying urethane paint you should be using a fresh air breathing system because urethane contains isocyanates and they are very bad for your health.

I think what Addo was trying to say about the primer is that you only have a limited amount of time to topcoat without having to resand. The PPG line of epoxy primer for example can be topcoated up to 7 days (IIRC)after being sprayed. If not topcoated (with sealer, color, etc.), then it must be scuffed (sanded) to provide a surface with enough bite for the next topcoat. Yep, the epoxy dries that hard.
Phil, USAF Retired
'61 Futura 2dr
'62 Sports Futura, 200/C4
ASE Master Re-Certified Collision & Refinishing Technician

Guest

Post #13 by Guest » Sat Nov 23, 2002 2:34 am

Thanks for clearing this up, Phil- I guess I'll just find another color than ford red to do my valve cover in- maybe there's another red that would hold up better.

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