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is the 300 an even fire eng,what is the leanest cylinder

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Turbo F100
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is the 300 an even fire eng,what is the leanest cylinder

Post #1 by Turbo F100 » Sun Feb 11, 2007 8:43 pm

if any one could answer these two questions it would be great

thanks!!!

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StrangeRanger
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Post #2 by StrangeRanger » Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:14 pm

All inline 6 engines regardless of make or model are even fire. Only 90° V-6 engines have the odd-fire/even-fire issue.

Leanest cylinder? Probably #6 but i wouldn't bet the farm.
1996 F-150 (tow missile)
1993 Mustang 5.0 (hot rod and auto-x monster)
1982 Tiga Formula Ford (SCCA racecar)
2013 Hyundai Elantra Coupe (daily driver)

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Geezer 300
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Post #3 by Geezer 300 » Sun Feb 11, 2007 9:42 pm

Shucks, I wanted your farm!! I was gonna bet on #1...especially under 2 G's of acceleration, where everything rushes to the back! :lol:
77 Ford 300 500 Performer, Offy C, BBF 1.73 rockers, dual oil filters w/oil cooler, Jacobs ignition, 5 spd o/d tranny, 3.55 Dana 44, Pacesetter headers...more to come
2004 Mustang SVT Cobra convertible

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StrangeRanger
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Post #4 by StrangeRanger » Sun Feb 11, 2007 10:08 pm

2 Gs? With a 300?
You only get 1 g driving it off a cliff.
1996 F-150 (tow missile)
1993 Mustang 5.0 (hot rod and auto-x monster)
1982 Tiga Formula Ford (SCCA racecar)
2013 Hyundai Elantra Coupe (daily driver)

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Geezer 300
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Post #5 by Geezer 300 » Sun Feb 11, 2007 10:34 pm

We can all dream, can't we?? Been on this forum for a while and finally figured out that people want a steady smooth six, with 600 hp, 700 ft. lbs. torque... and 100 mpg :lol:
77 Ford 300 500 Performer, Offy C, BBF 1.73 rockers, dual oil filters w/oil cooler, Jacobs ignition, 5 spd o/d tranny, 3.55 Dana 44, Pacesetter headers...more to come

2004 Mustang SVT Cobra convertible

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THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
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Post #6 by THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER » Sun Feb 11, 2007 10:40 pm

StrangeRanger wrote:2 Gs? With a 300?

<----

It could happen...
FORD 300 INLINE SIX - THE BEST KEPT SECRET IN DRAG RACING

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Post #7 by StrangeRanger » Sun Feb 11, 2007 11:08 pm

S=1/2 x a x t^2

1320 = 0.5 x 62.34 x t^2

6.5076 = t

which is pretty quick for a small displacement gasoline burner

What is the index for J/A?
1996 F-150 (tow missile)
1993 Mustang 5.0 (hot rod and auto-x monster)
1982 Tiga Formula Ford (SCCA racecar)
2013 Hyundai Elantra Coupe (daily driver)

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82F100
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Post #8 by 82F100 » Mon Feb 12, 2007 10:26 am

J/A index is 8.48, E/EA is 8.98
300's make good truck motors....not race motors

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Post #9 by shmoozo » Mon Feb 12, 2007 8:02 pm

82F100 wrote:J/A index is 8.48, E/EA is 8.98


It's worth remembering that a car doesn't accelerate at a uniform rate during the entire duration of a drag race. It's entirely possible that the G forces would vary quite a bit from the initial launch to the other end of the track. There's also likely to be some moments of extreme variance during shifts.

:)

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THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER
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Post #10 by THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER » Mon Feb 12, 2007 9:21 pm

StrangeRanger wrote:S=1/2 x a x t^2

1320 = 0.5 x 62.34 x t^2

6.5076 = t

which is pretty quick for a small displacement gasoline burner

What is the index for J/A?


SR,
That is assuming a constant rate of acceleration as schmoozo pointed out. Drag racing cars do not accelerate at a constant rate. The initial leave is a much higher G loading than going thru the traps. So, for example, a car like my altered may leave the line at 2 or 3 Gs and the G loading will decrease as it travels down the track. (Top Fuel Cars leave the line at something like 7 or 8 Gs, tantamount to an aircraft carrier catapult launch)

Several years ago I calculated that my car travels the quarter mile faster than if I pushed it off a quarter mile cliff. In a perfect vacuum that is about a 9.05 but in air at sea level it is something like 9.7 at a terminal speed of about 120.

Getting back to Turbo F150's question about what is the leanest cylinder I think assumptions about it being the first or last one are valid and good arguments can be made for either, in the absense of any hard dynamometer data. You could say #6 because it probably runs hotter and you could say #1 because of the 4 degree tilt to the intake coupled with the G loading. Turbo 150 needs to understand that WOT and Part Throttle conditions vary greatly and it is probable that the leanest cylinder varies with throttle opening, load, and speed. Sometimes, like in the case of a CFI style fuel injection/throttle body, part throttle fuel distribution is worse than at wide open throttle(I detest CFI systems), maybe to the tune of as much as FIVE air/fuel ratios.

I love using examples from drag racing and to conclude I will relay that Top Fuel Racer Kenny Bernstein found that a T/F car was accelerating so fast that from the time a single intake valve opened and fuel was introduced into the cylinder the car was accelerating so fast that the fuel ended up at the rear of the combustion chamber, thus stratifying the charge and necessitating the need for a second spark plug placed at the back of the chamber just to keep the cylinder lit.
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Post #11 by Lazy JW » Mon Feb 12, 2007 10:02 pm

THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER wrote: ...
I love using examples from drag racing and to conclude I will relay that Top Fuel Racer Kenny Bernstein found that a T/F car was accelerating so fast that from the time a single intake valve opened and fuel was introduced into the cylinder the car was accelerating so fast that the fuel ended up at the rear of the combustion chamber, thus stratifying the charge and necessitating the need for a second spark plug placed at the back of the chamber just to keep the cylinder lit.


WOW! :shock: :shock:

IIRC it seems I once read that the X-15 could sustain 8 G's of acceleration for 45 seconds. What a RUSH 8) 8)
Joe
"The White OX" 1974 F-350 300-6, Stock single exhaust, Carter YF, T-18A, Dana70 w/4.11, Flatbed dually w/dump bed. "Where no oxen are, the crib is clean, but much increase is by the strength of the ox" (Proverbs 14:4)
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Post #12 by shmoozo » Tue Feb 13, 2007 5:17 pm

THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER wrote:SR,
That is assuming a constant rate of acceleration as schmoozo pointed out. Drag racing cars do not accelerate at a constant rate. The initial leave is a much higher G loading than going thru the traps. So, for example, a car like my altered may leave the line at 2 or 3 Gs and the G loading will decrease as it travels down the track.


That initial launch would be quite a thrill for most of us.

THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER wrote:(Top Fuel Cars leave the line at something like 7 or 8 Gs, tantamount to an aircraft carrier catapult launch)


Cripes! That actually sounds painful!

THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER wrote:Several years ago I calculated that my car travels the quarter mile faster than if I pushed it off a quarter mile cliff. In a perfect vacuum that is about a 9.05 but in air at sea level it is something like 9.7 at a terminal speed of about 120.

Getting back to Turbo F150's question about what is the leanest cylinder I think assumptions about it being the first or last one are valid and good arguments can be made for either, in the absense of any hard dynamometer data. You could say #6 because it probably runs hotter and you could say #1 because of the 4 degree tilt to the intake coupled with the G loading. Turbo 150 needs to understand that WOT and Part Throttle conditions vary greatly and it is probable that the leanest cylinder varies with throttle opening, load, and speed. Sometimes, like in the case of a CFI style fuel injection/throttle body, part throttle fuel distribution is worse than at wide open throttle(I detest CFI systems), maybe to the tune of as much as FIVE air/fuel ratios.

I love using examples from drag racing and to conclude I will relay that Top Fuel Racer Kenny Bernstein found that a T/F car was accelerating so fast that from the time a single intake valve opened and fuel was introduced into the cylinder the car was accelerating so fast that the fuel ended up at the rear of the combustion chamber, thus stratifying the charge and necessitating the need for a second spark plug placed at the back of the chamber just to keep the cylinder lit.


Whoa ... That really puts things in perspective, doesn't it?

:)

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Post #13 by THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER » Tue Feb 13, 2007 8:37 pm

Interesting, no? Here's some more hard data to digest, pertaining particularly to 300 powered roadsters:

My car does zero-to-sixty foot in 1.22 seconds. Using SRs acceleration formula that means it averages 2.5 Gs over that distance. And NHRA National Record Holder Steve Ambrose does 0 - 60 in 1.08 sec. so he is averaging about 3.1 Gs in his billet-headed 300 (320ci) six.

These cars actually accelerate a touch faster than a Formula 1 car and would trounce a Nextel Cup car in the quarter.

Sorry about hijacking your thread Turbo F100. Hope it was informative at least.
FORD 300 INLINE SIX - THE BEST KEPT SECRET IN DRAG RACING

Turbo F100
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Post #14 by Turbo F100 » Mon Feb 19, 2007 3:05 pm

SORRY FOR NOT REPLYING SOONER!!!!! thanks for answering my questions!!!! i wonder how you can get 320ci out of a 300 ford!!

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