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I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

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f100owner
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I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #1 by f100owner » Mon Oct 26, 2015 9:21 am

On my daily driver, a 69 f100 with stock 240, I have experienced some degree of first-start ticking from the engine. usually quits after a minute or two. Over the weekend, on our first cool morning, the ticking was much louder and noticeable and took 3-5 minutes to finally subside.
A friend sitting in the truck when I started it this weekend (a Chevy guy) asked if I had solid or hydraulic lifters and I honestly could not answer him. I know the lifters on my old shovelhead harley were hydraulic (albeit they worked on very little pressure), but I was uncertain as to the proper answer here. I had taken some superficial efforts to minimize the noise in the past including changing oil to 10-40 Chevron Delo LE, installing a Ford FL1A oil filter and installing the oil filter relocation part from Ford Racing to make sure the filter always have oil.
My friend asked how challenging it would be to change out the lifters. Being only a Chevy V8 guy he had no clue on the Ford Straight Six.
So can someone educate me here on my options and approaches and perhaps provide me a better, condensed understanding of oil flow in the Straight Six.
Texas;
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #2 by arse_sidewards » Mon Oct 26, 2015 11:07 am

f100owner wrote:On my daily driver, a 69 f100 with stock 240, I have experienced some degree of first-start ticking from the engine. usually quits after a minute or two. Over the weekend, on our first cool morning, the ticking was much louder and noticeable and took 3-5 minutes to finally subside.
A friend sitting in the truck when I started it this weekend (a Chevy guy) asked if I had solid or hydraulic lifters and I honestly could not answer him. I know the lifters on my old shovelhead harley were hydraulic (albeit they worked on very little pressure), but I was uncertain as to the proper answer here. I had taken some superficial efforts to minimize the noise in the past including changing oil to 10-40 Chevron Delo LE, installing a Ford FL1A oil filter and installing the oil filter relocation part from Ford Racing to make sure the filter always have oil.
My friend asked how challenging it would be to change out the lifters. Being only a Chevy V8 guy he had no clue on the Ford Straight Six.
So can someone educate me here on my options and approaches and perhaps provide me a better, condensed understanding of oil flow in the Straight Six.


oil pan -> pickup -> pump -> internal pressure bypass (recirculates into pickup side of pump) -> filter -> main oil galley (and pressure sender port) -> main bearings (then crank and rods from there) -> cam -> lifters -> pushrods -> rocker arms and other top end stuff -> drains back into pan


I'm not sure if a 69 is hydraulic or mechanical lifters, either way it's flat tappet so you can't just swap lifters around like it's nothing because the lifters and cam get broken in together. Don't swap one without swapping the other. You can do it but it's more likely to eat the cam than work out ok. Other than new lifters and cam you could possibly get a junkyard cam and lifter set.

If you're running an oil filter relocation kit without a check valve in the relocation adapter (I've never seen one that had one) then it's taking longer for oil to get to the filter and everything else. If by relocation adapter you mean right angle adapter so that the open end of the filter points up then you're fine. The FL1 has a check valve in it so it should take weeks or months to drain even if it's horizontal.

Changing lifters is easy as heck, take off the valve cover and lifter cover, remove rocker arms, pushrods and lifters.
1994 F150 4x4 8ft, engine is basically stock.

66" leafs, extended radius arms, lockers in both ends, nothing special.

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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #3 by f100owner » Mon Oct 26, 2015 1:19 pm

Hate to hear one should not replace lifters without replacing the cam shaft. And yes this is an angle adapter. Engine has about 37K on it.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #4 by bubba22349 » Mon Oct 26, 2015 2:51 pm

:hmmm: As far as I know all the 240 & 300 sixes came stock with Hyd. Lifters. Before you dive into changing lifters and cam I would try resetting the rockers first, since yours is an early engine (69) they are adjustable and are set just like a Chevy V8. When these engines were new they used straight 30 weight oil, Personally I think a 10 w 40 might be a little thin until the engine warms up, unless your engine was built with much tighter clearances then normal, and or you live were it's very cold like maybe in Alaska. Good luck :nod:
A bad day Drag Racing is still better than a good day at work!

I am still hunting for a project car to build but with my current low budget it's not looking so good. My Ex- Fleet of Sixes these are all long gone! :bang: 1954 Customline 223 3 speed with O/D, 1963 Fairlane project drag car with BB6, 1977 Maverick 250 with C4, 1994 F-150 a 300 with 5 speed.

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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #5 by f100owner » Mon Oct 26, 2015 3:00 pm

Not diving into anything just yet. Trying to figure out some options. I still have a 240 that I am getting close to starting for the first time since a long block rebuild (not by me, hopefully someone competent).
By resetting, do you mean adjusting. I was considering pulling the valve cover and at least see if there were any adjusters really loose. I seem to recall a thread somewhere in this or another forum about adjusting the lifters.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #6 by bubba22349 » Mon Oct 26, 2015 3:08 pm

Yes Adjusting, they have head studs with a ball type rocker arms and an adjustable locking nut. With engine running and warmed up good back them off until they start to click then tighten back down until they stop clicking, next tighten from 1/4 to 1 turn more, depending on what you like. Good luck :nod:
A bad day Drag Racing is still better than a good day at work!

I am still hunting for a project car to build but with my current low budget it's not looking so good. My Ex- Fleet of Sixes these are all long gone! :bang: 1954 Customline 223 3 speed with O/D, 1963 Fairlane project drag car with BB6, 1977 Maverick 250 with C4, 1994 F-150 a 300 with 5 speed.

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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #7 by f100owner » Mon Oct 26, 2015 3:21 pm

You use the same approach for all and it does not matter if each cylinder is in its exhaust or compression stroke? Just thinking back to my days trying to keep my shovelhead running, I had to make sure what stroke the cylinder was in before adjusting.
Bet this is in my factory service manual as well.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #8 by bubba22349 » Mon Oct 26, 2015 4:12 pm

Yes with this warmed up running method both exhaust and intake are adjusted the same. Some people also like to use a cold non running method of adjustment on a new rebuilt engine because it's cleaner. But with either way both intake and exhaust are set the same on 240/300 as with many other adjustable rocker Hyd. Lifter (Zero Lash) engines. Good luck :nod:
A bad day Drag Racing is still better than a good day at work!

I am still hunting for a project car to build but with my current low budget it's not looking so good. My Ex- Fleet of Sixes these are all long gone! :bang: 1954 Customline 223 3 speed with O/D, 1963 Fairlane project drag car with BB6, 1977 Maverick 250 with C4, 1994 F-150 a 300 with 5 speed.

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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #9 by chessterd5 » Mon Oct 26, 2015 9:17 pm

So, not to hijack a thread but, I can't get away with just putting new lifters on an old cam?

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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #10 by bubba22349 » Mon Oct 26, 2015 9:37 pm

The best way is to use a new or reground cam too. Though its not the best practice Sometimes you can get away using new lifters on a used cam, but it's going to depend on the condition of your cam. Good luck :nod:
A bad day Drag Racing is still better than a good day at work!

I am still hunting for a project car to build but with my current low budget it's not looking so good. My Ex- Fleet of Sixes these are all long gone! :bang: 1954 Customline 223 3 speed with O/D, 1963 Fairlane project drag car with BB6, 1977 Maverick 250 with C4, 1994 F-150 a 300 with 5 speed.

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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #11 by f100owner » Tue Oct 27, 2015 9:20 am

Without knowing the intricacies of swapping out a lifter, can anything be had by pulling lifters and cleaning them? If one does go ahead and does not swap the cam, but swaps out lifters what can happen?
One would think there would not be a lot of wear on an engine with 37K miles.
EDIT: Noticed several references on-line that the stock flat tappet lifters should never be replaced without replacing the camshaft.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #12 by bubba22349 » Tue Oct 27, 2015 3:16 pm

1. Yes you could clean the lifters though that's a big job doing each one individually. I make it a practice to keep lifters in order removed. After inspection and if I plan on reusing them then I Always make sure that a used lifter goes back on the same cam lobe.

2. The possible risk is that one or more cam lobes will get damaged or go flat when installing a new set of lifters on a used cam.

3. Yes if the engine had good care there shouldn't be much if any wear at 37,000. I would try doing a flush or two first before doing much disassembly. Justice Brothers engine flush is what I used to use for really dirty engines, within 2 to 3 regular oil changes it would clean the worst engines of the sludge. Good luck :nod:
A bad day Drag Racing is still better than a good day at work!

I am still hunting for a project car to build but with my current low budget it's not looking so good. My Ex- Fleet of Sixes these are all long gone! :bang: 1954 Customline 223 3 speed with O/D, 1963 Fairlane project drag car with BB6, 1977 Maverick 250 with C4, 1994 F-150 a 300 with 5 speed.

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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #13 by Luckyman » Thu Oct 29, 2015 1:23 pm

A quart of Rislone oil additive at oil change time has also been known to clean up "gummy" lifters within one or two oil change intervals and keep them clean with regular use.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #14 by CNC-Dude » Thu Oct 29, 2015 4:18 pm

With high friction components such as a cam and lifter, you find that if one of these components has wear on it, so will the mating part. One can't have wear on it and the other one not. So putting new lifters on a worn cam or vice versa is only going to lead to more problems. You stated that the engine only has 37K miles on it, yet one or the other of these parts is already showing signs of failure. This may be a sign of more to come if you don't replace all related components.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #15 by Dr Jay » Mon Nov 02, 2015 10:17 pm

OK, I was running a 280K shortblock. I dropped new lifters on the stock cam. Cheap, quick and really effective at quieting the valve train racket. While at it, new rocker set and pushrods were dropped in. I thought if this finished trashing the cam, I could buy a cam and another set of lifters, then reuse the new rockers and push rods. I had great results with this easy 2hr job and $120 in parts.
Was my reasoning flawed.?
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #16 by THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER » Tue Nov 03, 2015 8:37 am

Dr Jay wrote:OK, I was running a 280K shortblock. I dropped new lifters on the stock cam. Cheap, quick and really effective at quieting the valve train racket. While at it, new rocker set and pushrods were dropped in. I thought if this finished trashing the cam, I could buy a cam and another set of lifters, then reuse the new rockers and push rods. I had great results with this easy 2hr job and $120 in parts.
Was my reasoning flawed.?

no

We used to run series of experimental cams across a dyno engine without changing hydraulic lifters. Of course, all the cams were new and each got relatively few hours put on them. Still, for a cam with normal wear and no signs of failure I would say your chances of survival are high. If the cam still has some of its Parkerized hardcoating on it - the dull black sheen on the lobes - and isn't polished down below this coating all around, it will work. Look at the bottoms of the old lifters removed for telltale signs of failure. Some crown must remain.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #17 by sdiesel » Thu Nov 05, 2015 1:00 am

im betting on loose rockers- just makes sense on a relatively fresh engine.

set when rebuilt and as things settled the clearances did too

id use a cleaner too.. atf works real well
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #18 by f100owner » Thu Nov 05, 2015 7:49 am

Not sure I would use the phrase relatively fresh on this engine. Conceivably a nearly 50 year old engine with 37K miles. It does seem to be more noticeable of late with slightly cooler mornings. Thought about trying synthetic motor oil or the thinnest oil I could find. But will probably try a pint of rislone in the engine before the next oil change. Will be pulling the valve cover as well and at least check for finger tightness the adjusters.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #19 by f100owner » Fri Nov 13, 2015 8:09 am

Tried some Rislone. Could not find the concentrate (1/2 quart bottles) so used the regular stuff. Topped off my oil with it (about half quart). Some improvement seen the next day. Quite a bit of improvement.
Maybe thinking about doing an early oil change (only have about 2K miles on this change) and replacing a quart with two bottles of the concentrate.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #20 by arse_sidewards » Fri Nov 13, 2015 10:32 am

f100owner wrote:Tried some Rislone. Could not find the concentrate (1/2 quart bottles) so used the regular stuff. Topped off my oil with it (about half quart). Some improvement seen the next day. Quite a bit of improvement.
Maybe thinking about doing an early oil change (only have about 2K miles on this change) and replacing a quart with two bottles of the concentrate.


Be very careful thinning out your oil. These engines have a ton of bearing surface for the torque they produce and speed they operate at so you could probably run the think on water for a month and still get a good pressure reading. The rings however ride directly on the wall and if your lubricant is too thin you'll kill them quick (ask me how I know). If I were you I'd pull the fill cap with the engine running every few days to make sure blow-by isn't increasing.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #21 by Luckyman » Mon Nov 16, 2015 3:06 pm

For some reason or another, from the early days, the 240-300 engine family has had an issue with the lifters "gumming up/getting sticky". I have heard lots of them "clicking away" over the years and seen/heard a number of them cleared up with Rislone if it was not a mechanical issue.

I have used a quart of Rislone with 4 quarts of 10-40 at oil change time for almost the entire life of my original 76, 39.5 years,128K miles and have had no issues. Smokey Yunick used to peddle Rislone back in the day. He knew some stuff and did not peddle everything so I figured I was safe.

However, YMMV.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #22 by THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER » Mon Nov 16, 2015 7:01 pm

Luckyman wrote:For some reason or another, from the early days, the 240-300 engine family has had an issue with the lifters "gumming up/getting sticky".
However, YMMV.

I did not know that.
The six uses the same lifters as a V8.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #23 by Luckyman » Tue Nov 17, 2015 12:14 pm

THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER wrote:
Luckyman wrote:For some reason or another, from the early days, the 240-300 engine family has had an issue with the lifters "gumming up/getting sticky".
However, YMMV.

I did not know that.
The six uses the same lifters as a V8.


I probably misspoke with too much "broad brush". I've owned 4 different 240/300's since 1966 and known of approx a dozen friends and relatives with 240/300's in the same time period. Most of them developed clicking noises which were quieted to varying degrees by either doing an engine flush or using oil additives with detergent/solvent properties such as Rislone. It could be that the lifters are not the culprit and the noise comes from another source which can also be addressed with the flushes/detergents. So I admit my statement is not based on anything but anecdotal evidence and consequently may not be entirely accurate.

I sincerely appreciate your correction, as I am certainly not in your league of expertise on the Ford 240/300.
1 "76" F150 RC, LB, 2WD, 300, NP435, 9" open 3.00, special order 2-76/Delivered 4-76. Still "new".

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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #24 by 1986F150six » Wed Nov 18, 2015 9:04 am

Luckyman wrote:
THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER wrote:
Luckyman wrote:For some reason or another, from the early days, the 240-300 engine family has had an issue with the lifters "gumming up/getting sticky".
However, YMMV.

I did not know that.
The six uses the same lifters as a V8.


I probably misspoke with too much "broad brush". I've owned 4 different 240/300's since 1966 and known of approx a dozen friends and relatives with 240/300's in the same time period. Most of them developed clicking noises which were quieted to varying degrees by either doing an engine flush or using oil additives with detergent/solvent properties such as Rislone. It could be that the lifters are not the culprit and the noise comes from another source which can also be addressed with the flushes/detergents. So I admit my statement is not based on anything but anecdotal evidence and consequently may not be entirely accurate.

I sincerely appreciate your correction, as I am certainly not in your league of expertise on the Ford 240/300.


Nicely done, Luckyman.

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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #25 by mutt » Tue Nov 24, 2015 5:06 pm

the thing about new lifters/old cam- if the cam isn't worn- is using a good amount of assembly lube on the cam lobes, and lifter faces. i did that umpt miles ago..... the tappets were just worn after many miles, and replacements were cheap. but its what you start it up with is what matters. they get tired, after a while, lifters.

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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #26 by f100owner » Tue Mar 22, 2016 7:35 am

well, I have been running rislone in my engine for about 1500 miles.
It had not been getting worse, but not better. The last two times I have drive the truck, the tick-tick had turned into a clatter for a short while when under way. Also, yesterday, I noticed the tick-tick returning off-and-on after warm up.
Is she about to blow?
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #27 by arse_sidewards » Tue Mar 22, 2016 7:52 am

f100owner wrote:well, I have been running rislone in my engine for about 1500 miles.
It had not been getting worse, but not better. The last two times I have drive the truck, the tick-tick had turned into a clatter for a short while when under way. Also, yesterday, I noticed the tick-tick returning off-and-on after warm up.
Is she about to blow?


It'll probably tick for a really long time before anything seriously bad happens.
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #28 by THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER » Tue Mar 22, 2016 1:35 pm

f100owner wrote:Is she about to blow?

Would you care if it blew up and destroyed itself? Would you mind the hassle of finding a replacement engine to use as a core for a rebuild? Would you mind the extra expense of repairing major damage such as a holed block and blackened crank vs just replacing cracked pistons or timing gears before they give way?

If you don't care about having to go through getting a replacement engine to replace a scrapped hunk I would just keep driving it. On the other hand if you view sleuthing through this engine as you tear into it as a fun or interesting learning experience to see what literally makes it tick then take the time to go through it and make it better than new
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #29 by JackFish » Tue Mar 22, 2016 1:57 pm

I've breezed through this thread but I have to ask if you've checked the exhaust manifold bolts to see if any are loose?
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #30 by MechRick » Tue Mar 22, 2016 5:01 pm

f100owner wrote:I noticed the tick-tick returning off-and-on after warm up


You probably have an un-concentric lifter spinning in it's bore (which it is supposed to do). Wear patterns develop with severe use. As it rotates, the clearances change, creating a tick that comes and goes...
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #31 by f100owner » Thu Mar 24, 2016 7:47 am

Frenchtown, this is my daily driver. Outside of my Harley, this is how I get to work. Already been through one rebuild for my 71 F100 with 240.
So I am going to cheat. I visited with the service writer at the Ford house. They have two mechanics who are familiar with these old engines. I let one of them take a look at it. After leaving it with him for a day, he said one of the lifters at the back, very back if I am not mistaken, is basically loosing pressure very quickly. On another lifter, he said someone had cut down the stud a little and the locking nut (probably not right term) was continuing to back off. He found a shorter nut to use for it. He is replacing the lifters, and while he is at it going to be rebuilding the carb. Says it is running way to lean.
I admit when it comes to getting into these engines, I am not comfortable. Assembling pieces and bolting/unbolting stuff, I feel better with. Kind of thinking of buying another 240, stick it on an engine stand and see what I can learn on something I know so little about. There is a guy in Houston who has two for sale for $250. Of course, I would need my truck to get there to pick them up. Wish I could "apprentice" under some mechanic to get a better understanding. Somethings for me are just hands on. Some I can figure out from books and reading and pictures.
I am now prepared for the flames.
Texas;
1971 F100 - 240CID
2016 Ford Expedition
2015 Ford Fusion
2016 Harley - Ultra Limited.

arse_sidewards
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #32 by arse_sidewards » Thu Mar 24, 2016 1:51 pm

f100owner wrote:Frenchtown, this is my daily driver. Outside of my Harley, this is how I get to work. Already been through one rebuild for my 71 F100 with 240.
So I am going to cheat. I visited with the service writer at the Ford house. They have two mechanics who are familiar with these old engines. I let one of them take a look at it. After leaving it with him for a day, he said one of the lifters at the back, very back if I am not mistaken, is basically loosing pressure very quickly. On another lifter, he said someone had cut down the stud a little and the locking nut (probably not right term) was continuing to back off. He found a shorter nut to use for it. He is replacing the lifters, and while he is at it going to be rebuilding the carb. Says it is running way to lean.
I admit when it comes to getting into these engines, I am not comfortable. Assembling pieces and bolting/unbolting stuff, I feel better with. Kind of thinking of buying another 240, stick it on an engine stand and see what I can learn on something I know so little about. There is a guy in Houston who has two for sale for $250. Of course, I would need my truck to get there to pick them up. Wish I could "apprentice" under some mechanic to get a better understanding. Somethings for me are just hands on. Some I can figure out from books and reading and pictures.
I am now prepared for the flames.



Find something else to spend you money on, get a divorce, have a kid, get arrested for something, whatever. Once you no longer have the money to reasonably afford to pay someone else to do stuff you'll start learning really quickly. When your options are riding the Harley to work in negative temperatures and fixing the truck you'll fix the truck quickly. When your options are fix the truck or call in sick the truck won't break in the first place. If you really want to learn the most effective (and least realistic) option is to put yourself in a situation where fixing your own junk is the only economically sane option.

IMO you need to get it out of your head that you can pay someone else to do things for you. Most of the time they're looking to do things as quickly as they can get away with anyway (as will anyone who's paid by the job), they'll put head bolt and bearing lock nuts on with an impact wrench if it's 4:45 on a Friday and they want that job on that period's paycheck. Everything about working on a vehicle is simple. The catch is that you need consistency to do a good job and confidence in your ability to be consistent to do a good job. There's some REALLY dumb people who make a living working on vehicles, you're not going to get much sympathy if you don't at least try to learn. IMO it's only worth paying someone to do something that requires expensive tooling (basic machine shop stuff) or lots of skill and can't easily be re-done (usually paint, sometimes gears) or both (custom machine shop stuff).

Being comfortable with working with engine part (or any major assembly) and having a general feel for how it all goes together and does what it does is really important. The thing the probably helped me the most was parting out free/cheap engines from CL. Pulling a few apart without giving a crap gives you a feeling for how things should go and then don't have to seek advice every step of the way and can be confident in your ability to get something done from start to finish when it counts (like doing the timing belt on a DD over the weekend).

You can probably buy a few sets of OE grind cams and lifters for what the dealer will charge to replace a lifter or two. This kind of pattern is true for most repairs. You can try a small solution (just lifters), screw it up and throw more parts at it (to cover stuff that was affected by your screw up) and still come out ahead most of the time. If you go to the junkyard and get a used cam with its lifters you can probably screw up four or five times before the cost comes anywhere near what you'd pay someone else. With things that are cheaper and easier but take more time and care to do a good job (like brake lines) it's downright hard to screw up so many times that it would've been cheaper to pay someone. Sure you're out your time but you'd have wasting your time watching TV, arguing with your girlfriend/wife/kids if you didn't spend it wrenching so consider it trading time for education. It's not like you can't ride your Harley if you can't get something on the truck done in time.

Next time something breaks fix it yourself. Working on your DD is a more stressful way to do things than just paying but you're gonna have to get experience somehow and it's not like your current DD isn't already somewhat of a project. You can't be turning away from opportunities to gain experience just because it's your DD.

Once you get to the point where you're not scared of anything, just inconvenienced you'll be set:
"Oh, my transmission is slipping, better check CL for a quick replacement and order a rebuild kit for the once in my truck since you never know how long a used transmission will last. Dammit I wanted to go fishing on Saturday, not drive across the state to buy a transmission"

And since you mentioned engine stands, don't buy a normal engine stand to store engines, just build one off a shopping cart (gotta pick a good cart as your base though). Normal engine stands except for the really expensive ones can't hold something as long or tall as a fully dressed 300 without being unstable and having a lot of flex and they don't roll well unless you've got a mirror finished floor to roll them on. The 3 wheel stands with a long block are about as stable as just balancing and strapping a fully dressed engine to one of the small harbor freight dollys. I moved an engine on a friend's shopping cart engine stand over a rough cracked concrete floor and I'm going to be building myself one or two. They're that awesome.
1994 F150 4x4 8ft, engine is basically stock.

66" leafs, extended radius arms, lockers in both ends, nothing special.

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bubba22349
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #33 by bubba22349 » Thu Mar 24, 2016 2:44 pm

f100owner wrote:Frenchtown, this is my daily driver. Outside of my Harley, this is how I get to work. Already been through one rebuild for my 71 F100 with 240.
So I am going to cheat. I visited with the service writer at the Ford house. They have two mechanics who are familiar with these old engines. I let one of them take a look at it. After leaving it with him for a day, he said one of the lifters at the back, very back if I am not mistaken, is basically loosing pressure very quickly. On another lifter, he said someone had cut down the stud a little and the locking nut (probably not right term) was continuing to back off. He found a shorter nut to use for it. He is replacing the lifters, and while he is at it going to be rebuilding the carb. Says it is running way to lean.
I admit when it comes to getting into these engines, I am not comfortable. Assembling pieces and bolting/unbolting stuff, I feel better with. Kind of thinking of buying another 240, stick it on an engine stand and see what I can learn on something I know so little about. There is a guy in Houston who has two for sale for $250. Of course, I would need my truck to get there to pick them up. Wish I could "apprentice" under some mechanic to get a better understanding. Somethings for me are just hands on. Some I can figure out from books and reading and pictures.
I am now prepared for the flames.


:thumbup: Thats a great idea buying another 240 to ticker with, also pick up a good manual too and you be set, like Haynes etc. Well you just couldn't ask for a much easier engine to work and learn on then the old Carb models of the Ford 240 / 300 Six'es! Good luck :nod:
A bad day Drag Racing is still better than a good day at work!

I am still hunting for a project car to build but with my current low budget it's not looking so good. My Ex- Fleet of Sixes these are all long gone! :bang: 1954 Customline 223 3 speed with O/D, 1963 Fairlane project drag car with BB6, 1977 Maverick 250 with C4, 1994 F-150 a 300 with 5 speed.

f100owner
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Re: I need an education on oil flow in a straight six

Post #34 by f100owner » Mon Mar 28, 2016 2:32 pm

Admittedly, I am probably not worthy of this forum as I gave up and let a dealership mechanic resolve this issue for me (at least I am pretty sure there is one forum member who would concur with that assessment). The dealership mechanic replaced all the lifters (at least one of them was losing pressure nearly immediately), found two bent push rods and said one of the nuts was too tall and the anti-backoff feature was letting it back off because of a shorter stud or too tall of a nut. I am aware that simply replacing the lifters may or may not work depending on the wear of the cam shaft.
With that being said, is there anything I should do post repair - such as different oil or the like?
I do have the factory service manual - it's for all of the engines ford used in those years. But finding one specific to the big-block straight six would be nice.
And I am looking at making some room in my mother's garage (I just have a driveway), which houses my 71 f100 project, to perhaps get a 240 and break apart on my own to learn more about it. I do have a head sitting at the house. I had to break apart a 240 prior to having it rebuilt for my 71, basically removing all the tins, water pump, distributor, oil pump, etc. I can put them back together at that level, but the internals are somewhat of a mystery. I have figured out how perform leak down tests, vacuum checks (I use a vacuum gauge for tune up). I takes me a while, but I can get those things done.
I will say the truck ran very smoothly on the way to work from the dealership. Tempted to change oil when I get home (as this 3- wt. oil had a quart of rislone in it) and go back to my 20-50 Delo.
Texas;
1971 F100 - 240CID
2016 Ford Expedition
2015 Ford Fusion
2016 Harley - Ultra Limited.

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