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Required reading before building a 300.

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arse_sidewards
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Required reading before building a 300.

Post #1 by arse_sidewards » Wed May 22, 2019 9:09 am

I've got a plethora of 300s around and I want to build one in the next two years to swap into in my Ranger (tape measure indicates this will be a surprisingly easy swap as long as I don't mind cutting the firewall, which I plan to do).

I've been reading every thread on this forum since about 2012 so I like to think I'm well informed about the specifics of the 300 but I've never done a full engine build before, just occasional bearing/cam/whatever replacements.

What should my required reading be?

Ideally I'd like to find a book (or books) that includes the laundry list of modifications done to an engine when you rebuild it with performance in mind, the theory behind them and how to execute on them from a machining perspective. Of course I could just use a Haynes manual but that wouldn't give me all the tips and tricks (e.g. grinding off casting flash) that you do when you are working as a hobbyist building an engine for a project instead of just repairing a vehicle in an expedient manner. I plan to do a lot of the more laborious work myself to save cost. In machining there's a lot of different ways to get the same result and I feel like a noob like me would benefit from being able to reference known good ways to do things.

I know that basically all this info is on this forum and others in various forms, I probably have most of it bookmarked. The reason I want it in book form is so that it's all in one place and I can reference it.

Normally I'd just ask something like this on Pirate4x4 but they don't have the density of competent engine builders like we do here.
1994 F150 4x4 8ft, engine is basically stock.

66" leafs, extended radius arms, lockers in both ends, nothing special.

pmuller9
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Location: Columbus, Indiana

Re: Required reading before building a 300.

Post #2 by pmuller9 » Wed May 22, 2019 9:16 am

We tried to document most of the 240/300 six building information in this thread.
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=79408

There is stuff in this thread that you will not find in a book.
There are specifics about rocker arms and rocker geometry that are not here but can be found elsewhere.

arse_sidewards
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Re: Required reading before building a 300.

Post #3 by arse_sidewards » Wed May 22, 2019 9:30 am

pmuller9 wrote:We tried to document most of the 240/300 six building information in this thread.
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=79408

There is stuff in this thread that you will not find in a book.
There are specifics about rocker arms that are not here but can be found elsewhere.


I'm aware of the 300 specific details. This forum is great for that and that thread is/was long overdue. I'm looking for more general engine building info. I'm worried that if I don't have a defined procedure to reference that I'm going to make stupid mistakes. FTF's comment about remembering to deburr the rings after filing the end gaps is what sparked this thread. Those are the kind of things that aren't specific to the 300 but I'm worried I'd forget if it wasn't written in front of me.
1994 F150 4x4 8ft, engine is basically stock.

66" leafs, extended radius arms, lockers in both ends, nothing special.

pmuller9
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Posts: 3521
Joined: Tue Aug 06, 2013 12:33 am
Location: Columbus, Indiana

Re: Required reading before building a 300.

Post #4 by pmuller9 » Wed May 22, 2019 9:48 am

OK.
A lot of specifics that need to be known and checked involves the direction you choose and the choice of parts.
A lot of focus is always around the cylinder head.

Then there are things that are common to all combinations like block, rods and crank prep.
The best way to start is to post a preliminary combination and intent and the forum members can help you from there.

An excellent general assembly book is Reher Morrison Championship Engine Assembly.

arse_sidewards
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Re: Required reading before building a 300.

Post #5 by arse_sidewards » Wed May 22, 2019 10:34 am

pmuller9 wrote:OK.
A lot of specifics that need to be known and checked involves the direction you choose and the choice of parts.
A lot of focus is always around the cylinder head.

Then there are things that are common to all combinations like block, rods and crank prep.
The best way to start is to post a preliminary combination and intent and the forum members can help you from there.

An excellent general assembly book is Reher Morrison Championship Engine Assembly.


I have a build in mind and will post about it once I have the two key parts in hand (head and crank) but I am specifically trying to avoid discussing parts choice for now. I want the general engine building knowledge and parts prep knowledge.

Thank you for the lead. I may buy that book. It's a little pricey so I'll wait to see what others suggest though.
1994 F150 4x4 8ft, engine is basically stock.

66" leafs, extended radius arms, lockers in both ends, nothing special.

CNC-Dude
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Re: Required reading before building a 300.

Post #6 by CNC-Dude » Wed May 22, 2019 11:53 am

I worked in a racing machine shop for 15 years, and a lot of that tribal knowledge you just pick up from doing the same processes over and over again until it becomes second nature. Much of the things like deburring the rings after you file them is often just common sense thinking. You would also debur the top and bottom edge of all the cylinders as well as the edge of the piston skirts and any sharp edges on the piston tops around the dish if it has them and also around the piston tops. But that list can go on and on. I literally could write a book, and have, as well as written performance engine building tech articles for 4 automotive magazines before as a staff writer. But ask away, advice is free. LOL
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pmuller9
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Re: Required reading before building a 300.

Post #7 by pmuller9 » Wed May 22, 2019 12:56 pm

arse_sidewards wrote:I may buy that book. It's a little pricey so I'll wait to see what others suggest though.

It is almost 400 pages of design information with detailed discussions of each part including parameters and limits.
Some math, Detailed assembly instructions, glossary of terms and helpful tables ect...
With a better understanding of engine building theory you can formulate a good engine build plan from the start.

This is used as a text book in some automotive tech schools so you get the course without paying for tuition.
Not pricey in that respect.

sandboxer
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Re: Required reading before building a 300.

Post #8 by sandboxer » Wed May 22, 2019 3:35 pm

pmuller9 wrote:
arse_sidewards wrote:I may buy that book. It's a little pricey so I'll wait to see what others suggest though.

It is almost 400 pages of design information with detailed discussions of each part including parameters and limits.
Some math, Detailed assembly instructions, glossary of terms and helpful tables ect...
With a better understanding of engine building theory you can formulate a good engine build plan from the start.

This is used as a text book in some automotive tech schools so you get the course without paying for tuition.
Not pricey in that respect.

Ditto
It’s a great book written by those who have a reputation to uphold. I’ve read it a few times and it still feels fresh.
Cheaper than going to school!

BigBlue94
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Re: Required reading before building a 300.

Post #9 by BigBlue94 » Fri May 24, 2019 12:47 pm

Anything by David Vizard is a good read. I have his book on Holley carbs and it's very very helpful. Has the basics, the advanced stuff, and tips and tricks from racers and engine professionals.
1985 Bronco. 309ci I6, NP435, 4.56 gears, Detroit locker and tru-trac, 4" lift, and 37" swamper tires. The 309 is 9.75:1 CR with a Schneider 140H cam, 4bbl, roller rockers, larger valves, and headers.

sandboxer
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Re: Required reading before building a 300.

Post #10 by sandboxer » Sat May 25, 2019 11:10 am

Ditto on Vizard.
This one is a good all around informative read.
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