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The BC backcountry basher

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Harbottle
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The BC backcountry basher

Post #1 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 9:10 am

Hello everyone. I wanted to share my vision for my build and see what insight or experience you all have.

Truck: 1995 F150. 4.9L with SD EFI.
My reasons for building vs buying.
I live in Fort St John BC Canada - winters are cold and plugging in isn't always a option.
I put about 50,000 km per year on my truck: highway, bushwork, pulling trees, firewood, setting up hunting camp, hauling downed moose, elk, deer, crawling, climbing, dealing with washed out roads, overgrown trails, forestry roads, and 1000's of km of highway. My truck doesn't have a easy life and it will almost always have about 800-1500 lbs of stuff in the back.
What I need from my truck is this: power and torque that will allow me to do hwy speed with enough in reserve to pass a B-train and reliability.
The one complaint I have about my old truck is that it is painfully slow, thats why I wanted to rebuild and get more power out of it but keep the EFI for ease of starting in cold weather. So let's dive in.

Proposed performance: 200+ HP, 300+ ft-lbs, 1000-5500 rpm.
I'm just going to list mods and parts from intake to exhaust.

Cold air intake.

Stock TB EFI

19# injector

Head work - port and de-shroud the valves. Either bigger valves or longer rockers to move the rpm band up. Open up the intake and exhaust manifolds and port match.

Cam - Howard's makes a cam (CL280106-12) that works from 600-4500 so more intake ability should move the rpm range up to where I need it. I need to keep the LSA at 112 for the SD to see the appropriate vacuum and keep working properly. So that alone limits the cam selection, but a cam with a 5000 rpm range would be ideal. If you see one, please point me in the right direction.

Pistons - here is where I'm not really sure about what to do. From what I read, jacking up the compression on a high use daily is not the best because it really drives up the heat. But on the other hand, 9.5:1 would be that difference in making that extra bit of power. The other option keeping CR the same and optimizing timing advance. Please chime in on this. 87-91 octane is readily available.

Exhaust and smog controls - I'll run the stock manifolds with the exception of port matching the opening. 2.5 inch y pipe to the back, cat, smog pump, and EGR delete. I don't have emissions controls where I live.

TwEECer - after going over all of this at length with Mike, he believes that he can tune the vehicle right where it needs to be given these modifications as well as turn off the systems that are being deleted so it doesn't throw codes.

What will this produce for power? I have no idea.
Hit me up with your input, ideas, experience. :beer: :D :thanks:
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

sdiesel
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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #2 by sdiesel » Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:19 am

Save ur dough and avoid the cold air thing. Ford already offers that, with a better filter to boot.
Higher compression is predecated on available good fuel, and timing control.
My uneducated opinion, is hyper Pistons are perfect for your application with metric rings.

Do what you can to address cooling issues including an oil cooler. Most importantly an oil cooler u can Rob one from a big block or 351 Ford. They fit.

On this early EFI take time to clean, repair, replace the entire wire, vacuum harness.
Electrical communication is very very important on these systems.
Return this system to absolutely perfect factory condition.

Address the need to cool the injectors, avoid hood scoops .
I have found that upgrading the injectors to 4 hole has made a HUGE improvement in engine function, including of course new o rings.

Rebuild , replace distributor;, pip signal and the coil command come from this crucial piece.
Gasket matching is largely a waste.


Keep ur egr, cat don't hurt anything if it's functioning properly, unless you find ur in the 5000 plus rpm range a lot . and then the egr is non functioning in WOT mode anyway
Smog pump is a useless baggage. Leave the tad, tab, intact to avoid CEL.
KEEP a good o2 sensor. The pipe tends to crack in this area and make u crazy trying to deal it up.
Last edited by sdiesel on Sat Jul 04, 2020 12:24 am, edited 3 times in total.
a long love affair with the 300 six.
my lastest and final fling is a fresh 300 in an 88 ford f350 dually 4X flatbed

pmuller9
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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #3 by pmuller9 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:24 am

What transmission do you have?

Harbottle
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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #4 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:35 am

pmuller9 wrote:What transmission do you have?


M5OD-R2. I don't beat on the transmission. It just gets used well.
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

sdiesel
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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #5 by sdiesel » Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:36 am

Is this rig obd1?
Or the sefi fuel injection?
a long love affair with the 300 six.
my lastest and final fling is a fresh 300 in an 88 ford f350 dually 4X flatbed

Harbottle
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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #6 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:43 am

sdiesel wrote:Save ur dough and avoid the cold air thing. Ford already offers that, with a better filter to boot.
Higher compression is predecated on available good fuel, and timing control.
My uneducated opinion, is hyper Pistons are perfect for your application with metric rings.

Do what you can to address cooling issues including an oil cooler. Most importantly an oil cooler u can Rob one from a big block or 351 Ford. They fit.

On this early EFI take time to clean, repair, replace the entire wire, vacuum harness.
Electrical communication is very very important on these systems.
Return this system to absolutely perfect factory condition.
That is what Im working on right now. I agree, it runs like a bag of crap right now, so I'm looking after that part.

Address the need to cool the injectors, avoid hood scoops .
I have found that upgrading the injectors to 4 hole has made a HUGE improvement in engine function, including of course new o rings.
Are you saying that 4 hole injectors improve injector cooling?

Rebuild , replace distributor;, pip signal and the coil command come from this crucial piece.
Gasket matching is largely a waste.
Good call. I totally overlooked that part.


Keep ur egr, cat don't hurt anything if it's functioning properly, unless you find ur in the 5000 plus rpm range a lot .
Smog pump is a useless baggage. Leave the tad, tab, intact to avoid CEL. Im not sure what the tad and tab are, Ill look it up and see. Can you loop me in on what CEL is?
KEEP a good o2 sensor. The pipe tends to crack in this area and make u crazy trying to deal it up. Fair point. I need it to be reliable and cracks is something I really dont need to deal with.
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #7 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:44 am

sdiesel wrote:Is this rig obd1?
Or the sefi fuel injection?


I honestly dont know.
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

guhfluh
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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #8 by guhfluh » Fri Jul 03, 2020 11:03 am

Harbottle wrote:
sdiesel wrote:Is this rig obd1?
Or the sefi fuel injection?


I honestly dont know.

They're both OBD1 really. The later uses a MAF sensor in the air intake and i believe an o2 sensor in each exhaust manifold as the easiest way to tell.
1967 F-250 Crew Cab 2wd, 300 6cyl, T-170/RTS/TOD 4-speed overdrive
240 head, Offy C, EFI exhaust manifolds, Comp 268H, mandrel 2.5-3" exhaust, Edelbrock 500, Pertronix ignitor and coil, recurved dizzy. 200whp/300wtq

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #9 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 11:31 am

guhfluh wrote:
Harbottle wrote:
sdiesel wrote:Is this rig obd1?
Or the sefi fuel injection?


I honestly dont know.

They're both OBD1 really. The later uses a MAF sensor in the air intake and i believe an o2 sensor in each exhaust manifold as the easiest way to tell.


Ya its not MAF. Mine is the last year of the old style non OBDII
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #10 by guhfluh » Fri Jul 03, 2020 12:05 pm

4 hole injectors don't improve injector cooling, they just have a better spray pattern. Newer style injectors should also require less cooling than the original style.

Your goal of 200hp and 300ftlb might be attainable with the factory EFI intake manifold, but I doubt you'll get a power band to 5k and have low end. Unless you mean those figures at the crank and not at the wheels. The runner size and length is meant for midrange torque and I haven't seen any dyno with one make power that high in rpm. Theory around here is half of the EFI runners and a homemade plenum top should be a decent performance piece and from memory I think it's around 11" runner length and 1.75" dia?
1967 F-250 Crew Cab 2wd, 300 6cyl, T-170/RTS/TOD 4-speed overdrive
240 head, Offy C, EFI exhaust manifolds, Comp 268H, mandrel 2.5-3" exhaust, Edelbrock 500, Pertronix ignitor and coil, recurved dizzy. 200whp/300wtq

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #11 by BigBlue94 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 12:37 pm

For speed density v8s, the cam LSA must be 114 or higher. Not sure on the six.

Cams for the 300 are usually rated for rpm range in a 240. Take 1000 rpms off each number and that will get you the rpm range in a 300. For instance, my cam has an advertised rpm range of 2400-6000. It kicks in right off idle in the 300 and has power through 5000. Its not speed density friendly though.

Engine changes tend to freak out the speed density system, and you wont get near the power you think you should. I built a speed density 351 that desktop dynoed at 340hp and 475 ft/lbs. The factory injection system limits power at about 260 HP. You can have it tuned though, and larger than factory injectors will probably be needed.
1985 Bronco. 309ci I6, NP435, 4.56 gears, Detroit locker and tru-trac, 4" lift, and 37" swamper tires. The 309 is 9.75:1 CR with a Schneider 140H cam, 4bbl, roller rockers, larger valves, and headers.

Harbottle
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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #12 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 12:43 pm

guhfluh wrote:4 hole injectors don't improve injector cooling, they just have a better spray pattern. Newer style injectors should also require less cooling than the original style.

Your goal of 200hp and 300ftlb might be attainable with the factory EFI intake manifold, but I doubt you'll get a power band to 5k and have low end. Unless you mean those figures at the crank and not at the wheels. The runner size and length is meant for midrange torque and I haven't seen any dyno with one make power that high in rpm. Theory around here is half of the EFI runners and a homemade plenum top should be a decent performance piece and from memory I think it's around 11" runner length and 1.75" dia?


I never would have guessed that the intake runner length would affect it that much. Are there any links to EFI intake manifold mods?
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #13 by jgregg13 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 12:50 pm

I'll be watching this one. Cold air in Ft. St. John? I think you've got lots of that. :D I'll be really interested in the TwEECer as I may be convinced to go that way for my turbo application. Check the date code on your engine as mine is May '95 and the pistons I took out appear to be the Hyper-eutectic ones. They say that Ford changed the pistons about halfway through the '95 model year. So if there is not much wear, your pistons might be okay unless you need higher CR.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #14 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 12:50 pm

BigBlue94 wrote:For speed density v8s, the cam LSA must be 114 or higher. Not sure on the six.

Cams for the 300 are usually rated for rpm range in a 240. Take 1000 rpms off each number and that will get you the rpm range in a 300. For instance, my cam has an advertised rpm range of 2400-6000. It kicks in right off idle in the 300 and has power through 5000. Its not speed density friendly though.

Engine changes tend to freak out the speed density system, and you wont get near the power you think you should. I built a speed density 351 that desktop dynoed at 340hp and 475 ft/lbs. The factory injection system limits power at about 260 HP. You can have it tuned though, and larger than factory injectors will probably be needed.


Mike at TwEECer says that he can change anything in the SD system to suit internal changes with the exception of the cam LSA, he said that 112 deg will work but thats about it, I dont think I can even find a 113 or 114 LSA cam for a bix 6.
I will be going to a 4 hole 19# injector.
Interesting point about the cam rpm range. Any info out there on SD compatible cams and their actual RPM performance?
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

guhfluh
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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #15 by guhfluh » Fri Jul 03, 2020 12:55 pm

BigBlue94 wrote:For speed density v8s, the cam LSA must be 114 or higher. Not sure on the six.

Cams for the 300 are usually rated for rpm range in a 240. Take 1000 rpms off each number and that will get you the rpm range in a 300. For instance, my cam has an advertised rpm range of 2400-6000. It kicks in right off idle in the 300 and has power through 5000. Its not speed density friendly though.

Engine changes tend to freak out the speed density system, and you wont get near the power you think you should. I built a speed density 351 that desktop dynoed at 340hp and 475 ft/lbs. The factory injection system limits power at about 260 HP. You can have it tuned though, and larger than factory injectors will probably be needed.
SD in itself doesn't have a HP or cam limit. Factory SD hardware and software might have a limit, but if it is truly tunable the sky is the limit. SD is hard to tune for big overlap cams at low rpm and throttle openings, but still can be done and isn't impossible. Is there some limit with the Tweecer software? I do know it's a bit antiquated compared to modern stuff and burn times have got to be pretty slow.
1967 F-250 Crew Cab 2wd, 300 6cyl, T-170/RTS/TOD 4-speed overdrive
240 head, Offy C, EFI exhaust manifolds, Comp 268H, mandrel 2.5-3" exhaust, Edelbrock 500, Pertronix ignitor and coil, recurved dizzy. 200whp/300wtq

Harbottle
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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #16 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 1:51 pm

jgregg13 wrote:I'll be watching this one. Cold air in Ft. St. John? I think you've got lots of that. :D I'll be really interested in the TwEECer as I may be convinced to go that way for my turbo application. Check the date code on your engine as mine is May '95 and the pistons I took out appear to be the Hyper-eutectic ones. They say that Ford changed the pistons about halfway through the '95 model year. So if there is not much wear, your pistons might be okay unless you need higher CR.


ya its cold up here and winters are stupid long. we can count on snow for about 5 months.
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #17 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 1:54 pm

BigBlue94 wrote:For speed density v8s, the cam LSA must be 114 or higher. Not sure on the six.

Cams for the 300 are usually rated for rpm range in a 240. Take 1000 rpms off each number and that will get you the rpm range in a 300. For instance, my cam has an advertised rpm range of 2400-6000. It kicks in right off idle in the 300 and has power through 5000. Its not speed density friendly though.

Engine changes tend to freak out the speed density system, and you wont get near the power you think you should. I built a speed density 351 that desktop dynoed at 340hp and 475 ft/lbs. The factory injection system limits power at about 260 HP. You can have it tuned though, and larger than factory injectors will probably be needed.



I took your input and ran with it. I reached out to Howards and Crower to see if they can advise me further. I tell ya, just that little bit of extra knowledge can change this build a tonne. Thanks BigBlue94. :beer:
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #18 by BigBlue94 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 3:53 pm

Harbottle wrote:
BigBlue94 wrote:For speed density v8s, the cam LSA must be 114 or higher. Not sure on the six.

Cams for the 300 are usually rated for rpm range in a 240. Take 1000 rpms off each number and that will get you the rpm range in a 300. For instance, my cam has an advertised rpm range of 2400-6000. It kicks in right off idle in the 300 and has power through 5000. Its not speed density friendly though.

Engine changes tend to freak out the speed density system, and you wont get near the power you think you should. I built a speed density 351 that desktop dynoed at 340hp and 475 ft/lbs. The factory injection system limits power at about 260 HP. You can have it tuned though, and larger than factory injectors will probably be needed.


Mike at TwEECer says that he can change anything in the SD system to suit internal changes with the exception of the cam LSA, he said that 112 deg will work but thats about it, I dont think I can even find a 113 or 114 LSA cam for a bix 6.
I will be going to a 4 hole 19# injector.
Interesting point about the cam rpm range. Any info out there on SD compatible cams and their actual RPM performance?


Ive heard of one guy successfully running a 112 LSA in a SBF speed density, with a tune. I know virtually nothing about the tuning aspect. My V8 bronco burned and i got a carbed six! Tweecer or megasquirt are the two tuners i know of.

I dont know what injector is stock in the six, but 19 is stock in the 302 and 351. More on that in the next post...

Schneider Racing Cams offer a bunch of cams for the big six, and I have one of theirs in mine. But a 110 LSA. They grind to order, so customized sticks are easy to do. Comp cams made the roller for my 94 351, and it was a 114 LSA.
1985 Bronco. 309ci I6, NP435, 4.56 gears, Detroit locker and tru-trac, 4" lift, and 37" swamper tires. The 309 is 9.75:1 CR with a Schneider 140H cam, 4bbl, roller rockers, larger valves, and headers.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #19 by BigBlue94 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 4:03 pm

guhfluh wrote:
BigBlue94 wrote:For speed density v8s, the cam LSA must be 114 or higher. Not sure on the six.

Cams for the 300 are usually rated for rpm range in a 240. Take 1000 rpms off each number and that will get you the rpm range in a 300. For instance, my cam has an advertised rpm range of 2400-6000. It kicks in right off idle in the 300 and has power through 5000. Its not speed density friendly though.

Engine changes tend to freak out the speed density system, and you wont get near the power you think you should. I built a speed density 351 that desktop dynoed at 340hp and 475 ft/lbs. The factory injection system limits power at about 260 HP. You can have it tuned though, and larger than factory injectors will probably be needed.
SD in itself doesn't have a HP or cam limit. Factory SD hardware and software might have a limit, but if it is truly tunable the sky is the limit. SD is hard to tune for big overlap cams at low rpm and throttle openings, but still can be done and isn't impossible. Is there some limit with the Tweecer software? I do know it's a bit antiquated compared to modern stuff and burn times have got to be pretty slow.


As i just posted, im not very knowledgeable in the EFI, and only know what ive heard or read.

Correct that the SD system itself is not the limit. But the factory Ford SBF V8 SD system is limited by the factory 19lb injectors. They will be maxed out around 260 HP. My build i posted numbers of above ideally should have had 30lb injectors. But I was young and broke and just ran the factory efi system and tune. 10.5 CR, AFR 165 race ported heads, max spec'd cam, big intake, and headers. It was a strong motor as I ran it, but I never got to feel its true potential.

I cant remember which, but a newer car engine (GM or Ford) still runs speed density. I saw it and was surprised to say the least.
1985 Bronco. 309ci I6, NP435, 4.56 gears, Detroit locker and tru-trac, 4" lift, and 37" swamper tires. The 309 is 9.75:1 CR with a Schneider 140H cam, 4bbl, roller rockers, larger valves, and headers.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #20 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 5:36 pm

BigBlue94 wrote:
guhfluh wrote:
BigBlue94 wrote:For speed density v8s, the cam LSA must be 114 or higher. Not sure on the six.

Cams for the 300 are usually rated for rpm range in a 240. Take 1000 rpms off each number and that will get you the rpm range in a 300. For instance, my cam has an advertised rpm range of 2400-6000. It kicks in right off idle in the 300 and has power through 5000. Its not speed density friendly though.

Engine changes tend to freak out the speed density system, and you wont get near the power you think you should. I built a speed density 351 that desktop dynoed at 340hp and 475 ft/lbs. The factory injection system limits power at about 260 HP. You can have it tuned though, and larger than factory injectors will probably be needed.
SD in itself doesn't have a HP or cam limit. Factory SD hardware and software might have a limit, but if it is truly tunable the sky is the limit. SD is hard to tune for big overlap cams at low rpm and throttle openings, but still can be done and isn't impossible. Is there some limit with the Tweecer software? I do know it's a bit antiquated compared to modern stuff and burn times have got to be pretty slow.


As i just posted, im not very knowledgeable in the EFI, and only know what ive heard or read.

Correct that the SD system itself is not the limit. But the factory Ford SBF V8 SD system is limited by the factory 19lb injectors. They will be maxed out around 260 HP. My build i posted numbers of above ideally should have had 30lb injectors. But I was young and broke and just ran the factory efi system and tune. 10.5 CR, AFR 165 race ported heads, max spec'd cam, big intake, and headers. It was a strong motor as I ran it, but I never got to feel its true potential.

I cant remember which, but a newer car engine (GM or Ford) still runs speed density. I saw it and was surprised to say the least.


From what I gather, SD is the tuners choice in Europe. As long as vacuum is maintained, it works.
As far as tweecer goes, Mike (the main contact/tuner) says that there isn't really a limit other than mechanical and electrical problems with the engine and it is more tuner friendly rather than racer, but he tunes all kinds of V8's and V6's with it all the time. It's not a add on, its actual reprogramming the map for the internal changes in the engine and correcting air/fuel & operations so the ecu understands that it's supposed to be working that way.
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #21 by pmuller9 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 7:50 pm

Starting with the cylinder head:
Bigger valves and port work will increase the power band past 3500 rpm and create a long flat torque curve if using the correct cam profile.

The EFI head has shorter valves (4.75”) than the 1984 and earlier carb heads (4.81”)
There aren’t any larger diameter valves in the 4.75” length.
SI valves sometimes carries the 1.94” intake and 1.60” exhaust valves in the 4.81” length.
Otherwise you are looking at using the SBC valves which start at 4.91” length and have a variety of diameters to work with.

The 4.75” length valves restrict the valve lift to .500”. Over .500” valve lift runs the valve spring retainer into the top of the valve guide.

The EFI head has non adjustable pedestal mount rocker arms. You may have to shim the pedestals to accommodate a longer valve stem.

If you are looking at valve lifts at .500” and above it is recommended to use roller rockers.
The only available pedestal mount roller rocker is the Scorpion 1059. It is a 1.73 ratio rocker arm.
No one has reported on their use so I can’t tell you how well they worked.

The other solution (and most common) is to drill and tap for 7/16 studs and use stud mount roller rockers with pushrod guide plates.
Harland Sharp has the correct length stud mount roller rockers in the stock 1.6 ratio or the 1.75 ratio.

The stock EFI combustion chamber restricts airflow under .350" valve lift.
If you open up the chamber and use larger valves (1.84" intake and 1.60" exhaust) along with port work in the bowl area the flow is significantly increased.
However the swirl characteristics of the shrouded chamber is eliminated and you need to add a few degrees to the ignition timing

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #22 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 8:19 pm

pmuller9 wrote:Starting with the cylinder head:
Bigger valves and port work will increase the power band past 3500 rpm and create a long flat torque curve if using the correct cam profile.

The EFI head has shorter valves (4.75”) than the 1984 and earlier carb heads (4.81”)
There aren’t any larger diameter valves in the 4.75” length.
SI valves sometimes carries the 1.94” intake and 1.60” exhaust valves in the 4.81” length.
Otherwise you are looking at using the SBC valves which start at 4.91” length and have a variety of diameters to work with.

The 4.75” length valves restrict the valve lift to .500”. Over .500” valve lift runs the valve spring retainer into the top of the valve guide.

The EFI head has non adjustable pedestal mount rocker arms. You may have to shim the pedestals to accommodate a longer valve stem.

If you are looking at valve lifts at .500” and above it is recommended to use roller rockers.
The only available pedestal mount roller rocker is the Scorpion 1059. It is a 1.73 ratio rocker arm.
No one has reported on their use so I can’t tell you how well they worked.

The other solution (and most common) is to drill and tap for 7/16 studs and use stud mount roller rockers with pushrod guide plates.
Harland Sharp has the correct length stud mount roller rockers in the stock 1.6 ratio or the 1.75 ratio.

The stock EFI combustion chamber restricts airflow under .350" valve lift.
If you open up the chamber and use larger valves (1.84" intake and 1.60" exhaust) along with port work in the bowl area the flow is significantly increased.
However the swirl characteristics of the shrouded chamber is eliminated and you need to add a few degrees to the ignition timing


The port work is good news... the lack of bigger valves is not good news. How do I overcome the valve length problem? (assuming that i need to go that route)
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #23 by pmuller9 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 9:04 pm

Harbottle wrote:The port work is good news... the lack of bigger valves is not good news. How do I overcome the valve length problem? (assuming that i need to go that route)

If you find that the longer valve stem throws the rocker geometry off then you can raise the stock rocker arms up with shims under the pedestals and use longer pushrods.

As previously mentioned If you are going with .500" or more valve lift then convert to Harland Sharp stud mount roller rockers with pushrod guide plates and use longer pushrods.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #24 by pmuller9 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 9:47 pm

Camshaft Profiles.

First let me say that the catalog specifications for camshaft rpm operating ranges and compression ratios are rarely accurate and has caused problems for the few that trusted those specs for an engine build.

Second, a 112 LSA doesn’t necessarily make a cam EFI friendly. The stock cam has a 110 LSA.
It has more to do with the actual overlap period at the .050” duration specs.
The stock cam has a 192 degree .050” duration on a 110 LSA giving it a -28 degree overlap period.
The EFI 300 six seems to be OK with overlaps up to -10 degrees.
After that the idle mixture needs to be richer than Stoic something the stock narrow band EFI system has a problem with.
Moving the LSA out to say 112 allows a longer duration profile while still maintaining a reasonable overlap.
Changing to an aftermarket wide band EFI system allows a more flexible tune-up to accommodate larger profile camshafts with more overlap.

Having a power band from a 600 rpm idle to 5000 top end is a tall order.
The ones running a power band from 1000 to 1200 rpm out to 5000 rpm are using cam profiles around 220 degrees .050” durations. A good idle for these engines are 750 to 800 rpm.

One of these trucks was able to fence crawl by running a rich idle mixture but the highway mileage suffered.
If he leaned the carburetor out for good highway mileage then the idle became lopey and the off idle torque suffered.
These engines require very little throttle opening to maintain highway speeds so the engine is still operating off the idle circuit at cruise.

A good compromise would be a Schneider 131H (13910) .464”/.464” 208/208 262/262 112deg.
It has a -16 degree overlap for a smooth low rpm idle.
The .464” valve lift is stock rocker arm compatible.

The stock cam’s intake lobe center is installed 4 degrees retarded at 114 degrees ATDC.
The intake valve closes .050” from the seat at 30 degrees ABDC
The Schneider cam’s intake lobe center should be installed 4 degrees advanced at 108 degrees ATDC.
The intake valve closes .050” at 32 degrees ABDC which is only 2 degrees difference than stock offering great off idle torque.

Here is the difficult part that everyone struggles with.
The first thought is that since the stock cam is being replaced with an aftermarket cam the compression ratio can also be increased.
Not necessarily so.
The Ford 300 six works best with 87 octane pump gas with a Dynamic Compression Ratio (DCR) of 7.0

The stock cam has a .006” lobe lift duration of 268 degrees which is more than most aftermarket hydraulic street cams.
Since it is 4 degrees retarded with the intake lobe center at 114 ATDC the intake valve closes .006” off the set at 68 degrees ABDC.
The stock EFI engine has a Static Compression Ratio (SCR) of 8.8 and with the intake valve closing 68 ABDC gives it a DCR of 6.9

The Schneider 131H cam has a .006” duration of only 262 degrees and with the intake lobe center at 108 degrees ATDC gives a DCR of 7.4 with the same 8.8 SCR requiring at least 91 octane pump gas.
You would need to drop the SCR down to 8.5 to be able to tune the engine for 87 to 89 octane pump gas.

You could make it a little easier by only advancing the cam 2 degrees instead of 4 there would still be plenty of off idle torque.
Last edited by pmuller9 on Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #25 by Harbottle » Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:15 pm

pmuller9 wrote:Camshaft Profiles.

First let me say that the catalog specifications for camshaft rpm operating ranges and compression ratios are rarely accurate and has caused problems for the few that trusted those specs for an engine build.
Second, a 112 LSA doesn’t necessarily make a cam EFI friendly. The stock cam has a 110 LSA.
It has more to do with the actual overlap period at the .050” duration specs.
The stock cam has a 192 degree .050” duration on a 110 LSA giving it a -28 degree overlap period.
The EFI 300 six seems to be OK with overlaps up to -10 degrees.
After that the idle mixture needs to be richer than Stoic something the stock narrow band EFI system has a problem with.
Moving the LSA out to say 112 allows a longer duration profile while still maintaining a reasonable overlap.
Changing to an aftermarket wide band EFI system allows a more flexible tune-up to accommodate larger profile camshafts.

Having a power band from a 600 rpm idle to 5000 top end is a tall order.
The ones running a power band from 1000 to 1200 rpm out to 5000 rpm are using cam profiles around 220 degrees .050” durations. A good idle for these engines are 750 to 800 rpm.

One of these trucks was able to fence crawl by running a rich idle but the highway mileage suffered.
If he leaned the carburetor out for good highway mileage then the idle became lopey and the off idle torque suffered.
These engines require very little throttle opening to maintain highway speeds so the engine is still operating off the idle circuit at cruise.

A good compromise would be a Schneider 131H (13910) .464”/.464” 208/208 262/262 112deg.
It has a -16 degree overlap for a smooth low rpm idle.
The .464” valve lift is stock rocker arm compatible.


The Schneider 131H cam has a .006” duration of only 262 degrees and with the intake lobe center at 108 degrees ATDC gives a DCR of 7.4 with the same 8.8 SCR requiring at least 91 octane pump gas.
You would need to drop the compression ratio down to 8.5 to be able to tune the engine for 87 to 89 octane pump gas.

You could make it a little easier by only advancing the cam 2 degrees instead of 4 there would still be plenty of off idle torque.


Great read. Thank you.
I want "performance" to begin around 1100/1200 and roll up to 5000, with "room" to 5500. So off idle 600 rpm isnt really what Im after. Currently all of my crawling and climbing is around 1400 -2500 rpm.
One thing about this cam profile that I like is that there is no internal tinkering needed for the compression snap that would be nice.
The other thing is that advertised rpm is 1800-4500, but you just said that I cant trust those numbers.. So how do I plan the right cam and valve train mods that will net me what I need? To I even need to think about valve work?

I was under the impression that these cams can't be advanced. Am I wrong?

The idle circuit is part of the carb system, so I think I might be able to tune around that throttle position issue. What do you think?

Looking forward to your reply
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #26 by pmuller9 » Fri Jul 03, 2020 11:50 pm

A 300 six responds well to bigger valves and port work.
The torque is increased throughout the rpm range.
The increased port flow is especially need to extend power beyond 3500 rpm.

Here are the 4 catalog cams that give a power band from 1000-1200 rpm up to 5000 rpm.
The upper rpm power depends on how well the ports flow with big valves and porting
These cams use compression ratios between 9 and 9.5

Crower 284HDP (19205) .509”/.517” 220/222 284/290 110deg
Howards 280996-10 .501”/.501” 221/221 275/275 110deg
Schneider 140H (13912) .496”/.496” 222/222 280/280 110deg
Erson E270321 (Hi-Flow AH) .504"/.504" 220/220 284/284 110deg

The problem is that with these cams and the proper head work the engine rarely operates at a stoichiometric 14.7 air/fuel ratio.
The stock EFI system uses a narrow band 14.7 ratio O2 sensor which would become useless for closed loop operation.
Most everyone changes to a wide band EFI system at this point.

The Howards cam you listed will respond close to 600 to 4500 with head work.
The fact that it has 10 more degrees of exhaust duration than intake duration adds 5 degrees of overlap over a single profile cam and negates the wider 112 LSA as far as overlap for the stock EFI system
It too requires less compression than the stock cam.

Cams can be advanced or retarded 4 and 8 crankshaft degrees by using one of the two Mr Gasket offset keys under the cam gear.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #27 by sdiesel » Sat Jul 04, 2020 12:48 am

Harbottle wrote:
sdiesel wrote:Save ur dough and avoid the cold air thing. Ford already offers that, with a better filter to boot.
Higher compression is predicated on available good fuel, and timing control.
My uneducated opinion, is hyper Pistons are perfect for your application with metric rings.

Do what you can to address cooling issues including an oil cooler. Most importantly an oil cooler u can rob one from a big block or 351 Ford. They fit.

a six gets hot in a truck and the lifters start complaining on a hard pull, an oil cooler is a precious tool to keep the oil from heat separation. ( cannot remember what the term for hot metal repelling oil)

On this early EFI take time to clean, repair, replace the entire wire, vacuum harness.
Electrical communication is very very important on these systems.
Return this system to absolutely perfect factory condition.
That is what Im working on right now. I agree, it runs like a bag of crap right now, so I'm looking after that part.


what is really important before flinging yourself off the cliff of high performance modifications is to get the engine to run in perfect tune as it ran the day it was made. get everything dialed tight and stock. from there you build on these very sage suggestions the guys are throwing at you. it must run dead even perfect so that a champagne glass filled will sit atop the valve cover and boil before it spills.

injectors. the 300 uses 12lb injectors at a higher pressure if my memnory is right. leave the injectors alone until performance modifications demand a larger flowing injector. in 95 you likely already have 4 hole injectors. o rings on the injectors are a commonly overlooked source of vacuum leaks.

Address the need to cool the injectors, avoid hood scoops .
I have found that upgrading the injectors to 4 hole has made a HUGE improvement in engine function, including of course new o rings.
Are you saying that 4 hole injectors improve injector cooling?

no, im saying that the injectors need to bee kept cool but avoid a hood scoop as they tend to interfere with radiator air flow.and that is vastly more important than a hood scoop. if you can direct air flow to the injectors with a aCPU fan set on a relay to function for 10 minutes after shut down you avoid boiling the fuel in the injectors.

Rebuild , replace distributor;, pip signal and the coil command come from this crucial piece.
Gasket matching is largely a waste.
Good call. I totally overlooked that part.


Keep ur egr, cat doesn't hurt anything if it's functioning properly unless you find ur in the 5000 plus rpm range a lot .even then egr is turned off by the computer at wot.
Smog pump is useless baggage. Leave the tad, tab, intact to avoid CEL. Im not sure what the tad and tab are, Ill look it up and see. Can you loop me in on what CEL is?


TAB and TAD are the twin brothers of the air injection system . they signal where the smog pump is to send the air mostly. any way they are the electro/vacuum segment of the air thermactor. leaving them connected avoids a CEL (check engine light)


KEEP a good o2 sensor. The pipe tends to crack in this area and make u crazy trying to seal it up. Fair point. I need it to be reliable and cracks is something I really dont need to deal with.


a header is in your future i can tell.
a long love affair with the 300 six.
my lastest and final fling is a fresh 300 in an 88 ford f350 dually 4X flatbed

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #28 by Harbottle » Sat Jul 04, 2020 10:11 am

sdiesel wrote:
a header is in your future i can tell.


Lol, flinging myself off the cliff... Good way to put it.
I am getting it running right and addressing the common issues first. Once that is done I'll be performing all the standard tests, compression, etc. To see what the engine is doing.
From there I will be building the engine to suit.
The one reason I don't want a header is the maintenance aspect. I use this truck for work in the bush and dealing with header issues when I need it to run and work is not what I'm after. This is also why I'd rather solve rpm range issues with a cam instead of cutting in new valves and surging the money on tuning.
I read that the stock manifolds flow really well up to about 5000, is that realistic or wishful thinking?
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #29 by pmuller9 » Sat Jul 04, 2020 10:43 am

EFI exhaust manifolds work fine up to 5000 rpm.
If you are going to tune using the stock EFI system, Schneider cams will do a custom cam on a 114 LSA if you want.
I still highly recommend doing head work to improve flow if you want good power above 3500 rpm otherwise the power drops off early just as the cam is trying to make it's best power.

Are you good with a die grinder?

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #30 by sdiesel » Sat Jul 04, 2020 10:52 am

Yes efi manifold s are the ticket, but the y pipe is a nuisance, and more leak prone than headers,
The y pipe is the problem.
But a modified pipe may yiel desirable result
a long love affair with the 300 six.
my lastest and final fling is a fresh 300 in an 88 ford f350 dually 4X flatbed

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #31 by pmuller9 » Sat Jul 04, 2020 11:29 am

sdiesel wrote:Yes efi manifold s are the ticket, but the y pipe is a nuisance, and more leak prone than headers,
The y pipe is the problem.
But a modified pipe may yiel desirable result

The OP has a 1995 truck with an EFI engine and stock EFI exhaust without any leakage problems.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #32 by Harbottle » Sat Jul 04, 2020 12:41 pm

pmuller9 wrote:EFI exhaust manifolds work fine up to 5000 rpm.
If you are going to tune using the stock EFI system, Schneider cams will do a custom cam on a 114 LSA if you want.
I still highly recommend doing head work to improve flow if you want good power above 3500 rpm otherwise the power drops off early just as the cam is trying to make it's best power.

Are you good with a die grinder?


Yes. I can die grind pretty well.
Porting the head is a must... I would like to avoid bigger valves if at all possible.
I reached out to Schneider about a cam, so we'll see what happens when July 4 celebrations are over.
Ya, I will be TwEECer-ing with the stock EFI.
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #33 by pmuller9 » Sat Jul 04, 2020 6:03 pm

Harbottle wrote:Porting the head is a must... I would like to avoid bigger valves if at all possible.
I reached out to Schneider about a cam, so we'll see what happens when July 4 celebrations are over.
Ya, I will be TwEECer-ing with the stock EFI.

I got it. Let me know if this is a good start for a plan.

As mentioned earlier the valves in the EFI head are short creating a challenge for valve lift and valve spring height.

You stated that valve lift is important which is correct. The new cam should have around .500" lift
After you get the cam or know the valve lift you will need to check valve travel with the valve spring retainer and valve stem seal in place.
If there is not enough clearance then you can shorten the top of the valve guide.
I recommend using metal jacket Viton seals.

Normally we install valve springs at a 1.70" height but you may only be able to get 1.650" from the valve pocket in the head up to the valve spring retainer.
Also the head is designed for a single coil valve spring. It has a cast in spring locator at the base of the valve guide tower that has to be machined away if a double spring needs to be used.
For a 5500 rpm limit with a hydraulic cam, seat pressure should be around 115 lbs and an open pressure in the 285 lb area at .500" lift.
The Crane 96803 valve spring is close to those specs at a 1.675" installed height.
If the retainer height is too low an offset retainer can be used to correct the height.

The intake valve needs the most unshrouding.
If the engine is in good enough shape to leave the short block alone then you can take .025" off the head surface to reduce chamber volume about 3 cc.
If you rebuild the bottom end with new pistons the compression can be raised with piston choice and/or block deck machining.

The compression will be determined by the cam specs.
I would like to see a single pattern cam with a 218 degree .050" duration lobe ground on a 114 degree LSA, valve lift near .500" using a 1.6 ratio stock rocker.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #34 by Harbottle » Sat Jul 04, 2020 10:34 pm

pmuller9 wrote:
Harbottle wrote:Porting the head is a must... I would like to avoid bigger valves if at all possible.
I reached out to Schneider about a cam, so we'll see what happens when July 4 celebrations are over.
Ya, I will be TwEECer-ing with the stock EFI.

I got it. Let me know if this is a good start for a plan.

As mentioned earlier the valves in the EFI head are short creating a challenge for valve lift and valve spring height.

You stated that valve lift is important which is correct. The new cam should have around .500" lift
After you get the cam or know the valve lift you will need to check valve travel with the valve spring retainer and valve stem seal in place.
If there is not enough clearance then you can shorten the top of the valve guide.
I recommend using metal jacket Viton seals.

Normally we install valve springs at a 1.70" height but you may only be able to get 1.650" from the valve pocket in the head up to the valve spring retainer.
Also the head is designed for a single coil valve spring. It has a cast in spring locator at the base of the valve guide tower that has to be machined away if a double spring needs to be used.
For a 5500 rpm limit with a hydraulic cam, seat pressure should be around 115 lbs and an open pressure in the 285 lb area at .500" lift.
The Crane 96803 valve spring is close to those specs at a 1.675" installed height.
If the retainer height is too low an offset retainer can be used to correct the height.

The intake valve needs the most unshrouding.
If the engine is in good enough shape to leave the short block alone then you can take .025" off the head surface to reduce chamber volume about 3 cc.
If you rebuild the bottom end with new pistons the compression can be raised with piston choice and/or block deck machining.

The compression will be determined by the cam specs.
I would like to see a single pattern cam with a 218 degree .050" duration lobe ground on a 114 degree LSA, valve lift near .500" using a 1.6 ratio stock rocker.


That sounds really good. I'll talk to the cam guys about it and see what kind of lift we can get. :beer:
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #35 by sdiesel » Sun Jul 05, 2020 2:02 am

More on the y pipe. If it's not leaking, it will. Especially after removing and replacing the manifolds, there will be a set to the pipe, and even the slightest change in angle can cause the blommin' things to crack right where they come together and of course u can't get a wire feed deep into the crevice to weld it up. Or they crack at the o 2 sensor.
However if you cut that all loose where they join into one pipe, and build your y pipe into true dual eliminating cat, resonator etc you can make the best of a bad situation. Use a wide band o2 they are fun and quite useful.
Ask the guys here where to put the X pipe. That shat about proper placement of x pipes is above my head.
a long love affair with the 300 six.
my lastest and final fling is a fresh 300 in an 88 ford f350 dually 4X flatbed

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #36 by THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER » Sun Jul 05, 2020 9:35 am

I like to cut the original head pipes off just ahead of the cat and add a merge collector instead of the aftermarket T-pipe.
FORD 300 INLINE SIX - THE BEST KEPT SECRET IN DRAG RACING

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #37 by BigBlue94 » Sun Jul 05, 2020 3:26 pm

THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER wrote:I like to cut the original head pipes off just ahead of the cat and add a merge collector instead of the aftermarket T-pipe.


Same here. I've used the flowmaster y-collector a couple times and really like the way it sounds. Seems to be the smoothest transition available commercially. I've got clifford long tubes on my 300, and made a y-pipe for it that has a 3" cat included. It tucks up nicely along the inside of the frame rail, above the crossmembers. 1.625" primaries, into 2.5" head pipes, into a single 3" exhaust.

I think you've seen this, but for the OP. Making a Y-pipe for the EFI manifolds would be significantly easier, I think. I would think that ideally, and unlike mine, both head pipes should be the same length for best scavenging. If the OP can cut and weld, buy a couple mandrel J-bends from the parts warehouse and a merge pipe and he could have a custom Y-pipe. I found it to be rewarding work.

Image
1985 Bronco. 309ci I6, NP435, 4.56 gears, Detroit locker and tru-trac, 4" lift, and 37" swamper tires. The 309 is 9.75:1 CR with a Schneider 140H cam, 4bbl, roller rockers, larger valves, and headers.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #38 by sdiesel » Sun Jul 05, 2020 10:07 pm

I always like to see that pic of the pipes
Thx
a long love affair with the 300 six.
my lastest and final fling is a fresh 300 in an 88 ford f350 dually 4X flatbed

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #39 by Harbottle » Mon Jul 06, 2020 9:36 pm

So this is what I got for cam feedback;

"look at the 256-H or the 256-2H and definitely raise the compression 9 to 9.5' - Jerry at Schneider.

Howards-


P/N 289996 VALVE LIFT INT. .475
GRIND special VALVE LIFT EXH. .496
ENG ford 6 INT OPEN 26.5
ROCKER RATIO INT. 1.60 INT CLOSE 63
ROCKER RATIO EXH. 1.60 EXH OPEN 76
CAM LIFT INT. 0.297 EXH CLOSE 23.5
CAM LIFT EXH. 0.310 OVERLAP 50.0
L/C 112.0 INT PHASE 108.0
ADV OR RETARD 4.0
INT. DUR 269
EXH. DUR 279 EXH PHASE 116.0
INT. DUR @ .050 215 ANGLE or LC
EXH. DUR @ .050 225
INT. DUR @ .200 xINT O @ .050 -0.5
EXH. DUR @ .200 xINT C @ .050 36
EXH O @ .050 49
EXH C @ .050 -3.5
LASH INT 0.000 OVERLAP @ .050 -4.0
LASH EXH 0.000

What do y'all think?
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #40 by F-250 Restorer » Mon Jul 06, 2020 11:04 pm

BigBlue94 wrote:
THE FRENCHTOWN FLYER wrote:I like to cut the original head pipes off just ahead of the cat and add a merge collector instead of the aftermarket T-pipe.


Same here. I've used the flowmaster y-collector a couple times and really like the way it sounds. Seems to be the smoothest transition available commercially. I've got clifford long tubes on my 300, and made a y-pipe for it that has a 3" cat included. It tucks up nicely along the inside of the frame rail, above the crossmembers. 1.625" primaries, into 2.5" head pipes, into a single 3" exhaust.

I think you've seen this, but for the OP. Making a Y-pipe for the EFI manifolds would be significantly easier, I think. I would think that ideally, and unlike mine, both head pipes should be the same length for best scavenging. If the OP can cut and weld, buy a couple mandrel J-bends from the parts warehouse and a merge pipe and he could have a custom Y-pipe. I found it to be rewarding work.

Image


I run the Clifford shorties, and built two pipes (2.5" each) that connect with the collectors. Those are 24" long, and connect to a Y pipe. Exiting the Y is a 4' length of 3" tube into a Flow master 50. From the FM to the bumper is a 2.5" tail pipe. It sounds nice.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #41 by sdiesel » Tue Jul 07, 2020 12:56 am

i can add only that schneider is a reputable company with a good product and they stand behind their work. i believe there are only 2 or three employees there. but they been at it a very long time, grinding cams.
a long love affair with the 300 six.
my lastest and final fling is a fresh 300 in an 88 ford f350 dually 4X flatbed

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #42 by pmuller9 » Tue Jul 07, 2020 12:10 pm

Harbottle wrote:So this is what I got for cam feedback;

"look at the 256-H or the 256-2H and definitely raise the compression 9 to 9.5' - Jerry at Schneider.

Howards-


P/N 289996 VALVE LIFT INT. .475
GRIND special VALVE LIFT EXH. .496
ENG ford 6 INT OPEN 26.5
ROCKER RATIO INT. 1.60 INT CLOSE 63
ROCKER RATIO EXH. 1.60 EXH OPEN 76
CAM LIFT INT. 0.297 EXH CLOSE 23.5
CAM LIFT EXH. 0.310 OVERLAP 50.0
L/C 112.0 INT PHASE 108.0
ADV OR RETARD 4.0
INT. DUR 269
EXH. DUR 279 EXH PHASE 116.0
INT. DUR @ .050 215 ANGLE or LC
EXH. DUR @ .050 225
INT. DUR @ .200 xINT O @ .050 -0.5
EXH. DUR @ .200 xINT C @ .050 36
EXH O @ .050 49
EXH C @ .050 -3.5
LASH INT 0.000 OVERLAP @ .050 -4.0
LASH EXH 0.000

What do y'all think?

The Schneider 256H or the 256 2H will have the lack of overlap needed for the stock EFI system but will not be even close for the performance you are looking for.
No way would you want over the stock 8.8 compression ratio in order to run on 87 octane pump gas with either of these cams.

The Howards cam will be closer to the performance but has too much overlap even though it has a 112 LSA.
One of the problems is that it is not a single pattern cam with more duration on the exhaust lobe.
Also the .496" exhaust valve lift pushes the limits of the valve travel on an EFI head.
You are keeping the very small intake valve so the help is needed more on the intake side than the exhaust.
The extra 10 degrees of exhaust duration adds 5 degrees of unnecessary overlap.

You want a single pattern cam with -10 degrees of overlap or less based on the .050" duration with an intake and exhaust .050" duration of 216 to 218.
That would require an LSA of 113 to 114 degrees.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #43 by Harbottle » Tue Jul 07, 2020 8:50 pm

I put out feelers for getting a cam cut of your description. Ill let you know what comes back, but just so you know, I am from Canada and getting parts here is a challenge sometimes. So I reached out to Colt Cams in Aldergrove BC, but if you dudes know of any other Canadian cam cutters, that would be really helpful.
I like a big 6 and I can not lie.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #44 by pmuller9 » Wed Jul 08, 2020 10:49 am

Do a compression and or a leakdown test on all six cylinders to see what condition the engine is in.

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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #45 by sandboxer » Thu Jul 09, 2020 7:01 am

Harbottle
I'm having Jim at Interior Cams (Salmon Arm) grind my cam.

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jgregg13
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Re: The BC backcountry basher

Post #46 by jgregg13 » Thu Jul 09, 2020 12:03 pm

Harbottle wrote:but if you dudes know of any other Canadian cam cutters, that would be really helpful.

Try Shadbolt Cams in Vancouver. They've been around the longest in this area (1954).
I would want to have the cam ground from a new blank rather than a regrind of your old cam. If they regrind the stock cam the base circle would have to be reduced a fair bit to get the lift and profile you want, so with the non adjustable rockers, you would likely have to shave the head or deck the block or other means to get the valve train geometry right.

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