All Small Six 223 Engine opinions

This relates to all small sixes

teggy87

Well-known member
So this is about what I figured so I should be able to remove these tubes then as they shouldn't be necessary? Im worried that the little sleeve on the end of that 1st tube either fell down into that oil galley or is lodged in there. Will that end up in the oil pan if It did fall into there?
So given that the 57 seems to be a better head than the 55 and I already have it, I'm going to take it to machine shop hopefully tomorrow have it cleaned and the valves adjusted.
I am trying to put some parts together, I want NGK plug wires and E3 spark plugs but every site I put my vehicle in says the parts don't fit.
Part of my problem is that I think my father and grandfather put a part of a 12v system in this truck but maybe didn't change all the parts😑... Idk so I'm having trouble figuring out exactly what parts I need 😑
I read that E3 plugs can help build compression, has anyone tried them on a 6?
What plug wires should I use? I want better than stock really but I don't need the best either, maybe 8mm?
Also I am contemplating upgrading the intake and maybe putting a holly EFI on it, thoughts?
Should I just have the old stuff cleaned and put it back together?
 

Bill56

Active member
If you are going to have the head off, you can probably find the lost tube and take it out while it's off.
I think I read that plugging the return tubes raises the oil pressure. The oil falling from the rockers will still find it's way to the push rod holes. ;)
If you want to spend money at the machine shop, get a 3 angle valve job. That might get you better valve seal and a bit more flow.
Maybe mill it some while it's there, too.
I can't see a plug change doing much for compression.
Perhaps go a range colder if you mill the head.
There are "universal" plug wires that let you roll yer own set. Takes care of finding a ready made set to fit.
 

bubba22349

Top Poster
Staff member
VIP
Supporter 2021
Supporter 2019
REDLINE 10K
I used my old desk top computer and can see the pictures even better now the oil one tube looks ok still has a seal ring on it and should work fine. The other one is missing part of the tube with its lip that holds the seal in place you would need to fix that to be able to reuse that system. Do you see the rest of the tube in the block oil passage? I see that the head you pulled is a 1961 or newer, would need to find the date code to know anymore. I see the short block has been bored out to a .060 over size too. you can get a very good set of plug wires from NAPA you sure don't need a 8 MM plug wire set on a stock Six volt system and using the stock old Load O Matic Distributor not enough spark energy to use the bigger wires. A DuraSpark II electronic distributor can be fitted with some work if you plan to change the truck over to a 12 volt system. Are they also doing a valve job on your head for the $200.00 or just a cleaning? If its just for a a cleaning then that would be expensive. The valves can not be adjusted until the head is bolted back on the engine short block. Edited
 

teggy87

Well-known member
I used my old desk top computer and can see the pictures even better now the oil one tube looks ok still has a seal ring on it and should work fine. The other one is missing part of the tube with its lip that holds the seal in place you would need to fix that to be able to reuse that system. Do you see the rest of the tube in the block oil passage? I see you head is a 1961 or newer, would need to find the date code to know anymore. I see the short block is bored out to a .060 over size too.
Really? So this engine has been rebuilt at some time then 🤨 I posted the only number I found on the head. I think it's C1AE-6090-D So you think it's at least 1961 or newer? This keeps getting more interesting. I can't find that other tube seal, worried about it's location inside the block. Hopefully I can fish it out.
So will this head even work properly with this block? 🤔 I'm not opposed to getting a better one if there is one available.
Can you buy copper head gaskets for this engine?
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20211010_172043.jpg
    IMG_20211010_172043.jpg
    2.9 MB · Views: 6
Last edited:

bubba22349

Top Poster
Staff member
VIP
Supporter 2021
Supporter 2019
REDLINE 10K
Yes its at least a 1961 Head C1AE-6090-D this number decodes as follows.
C = the Decade of 1960
1 = added to 1960 gives you a part Design year of 1961 sometimes the parts were used a few years. So finding a date code is needed to know more. These codes will usually look like a raised small metal tag with a straight screw head on each end they will have either a 3 or 4 digit code consisting of 1 letter and 2 or 3 numbers. See the pictures below for examples, the first picture is for a 3 digit code the second is for a 4 digit code.
6090 = Ford's generic casting number for a cylinder head.
D = Denotes that this part has been has been redesigned or improved in this case 4 times since its original design. Its a very good cylinder head and I am hoping to find a 1957 or 1958 cylinder heads for my build up or at least one of the 1961 to 1964 heads.

Yes the engine has been rebuilt several times by that .060 (oversize) stamped into the pistons. I would guess probably at lease 3 times, most first time rebuilds the blocks are bored out to either .020 or .030 oversize, than .040 and so on.

Yes should not be any problem with that cylinder head on your 223 block all years of heads are interchangeable. Early 223 stock heads 1954 to 1956 had the largest combustion chambers giving the lowest compression ratio and lowest horse power rating. The 1957 to 1959 heads had the smallest combustion chambers and this gave those years of 223 engines the highest compression ratio as well as the most horse power. The 1960 to 1964 heads went to a little larger combustion chamber again and drooping the compression ratio and horse power a little bit lower but they can also be milled to bring them back to the 1957 to 1960 heads chamber size or even smaller yet to raise the compression ratio even higher again. I did some editing to this post and to my above post so it has some additional info too. Good luck
 

Attachments

  • Casting Date Code 2.jpg
    Casting Date Code 2.jpg
    6.7 KB · Views: 3
  • Casting Date Code.jpg
    Casting Date Code.jpg
    3.5 KB · Views: 3

teggy87

Well-known member
First picture is the head date code? The second and 3rd are engine block codes? And the third is a data plate.
The truck has a 12v battery maybe I need to take pictures and see if you can tell me what I have
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20211021_083725.jpg
    IMG_20211021_083725.jpg
    2.9 MB · Views: 3
  • IMG_20211021_091217.jpg
    IMG_20211021_091217.jpg
    5.5 MB · Views: 3
  • IMG_20211021_091225.jpg
    IMG_20211021_091225.jpg
    3.4 MB · Views: 3
  • IMG_20211021_090212.jpg
    IMG_20211021_090212.jpg
    5.6 MB · Views: 3
  • IMG_20211021_093204~2.jpg
    IMG_20211021_093204~2.jpg
    2.6 MB · Views: 2
Last edited:

Bill56

Active member
The 12 volt battery might be a clue.
Does it still have a generator or has it been updated to have an alternator?
If it is a generator, what's the P/N? That can tell you if it's 6 or 12volt.

Also, now that the head is off, does it have a ridge at the top of the cylinders?
The general rule of thumb is that if you can get your fingernail to catch on it, it's too much.
If it is there, but very slight, hone it and move on.
Not trying to cause you more work and expense, just pointing out that this is the time to check that out.
 

teggy87

Well-known member
The 12 volt battery might be a clue.
Does it still have a generator or has it been updated to have an alternator?
If it is a generator, what's the P/N? That can tell you if it's 6 or 12volt.

Also, now that the head is off, does it have a ridge at the top of the cylinders?
The general rule of thumb is that if you can get your fingernail to catch on it, it's too much.
If it is there, but very slight, hone it and move on.
Not trying to cause you more work and expense, just pointing out that this is the time to check that out.
There is no ridge on the cylinders 👍 thank God, but I did take some super fine steel wool to the cylinder walls to remove some surface rust.
I do believe it is a generator still on it not an alternator and the headlights are 12 volt I think but the voltage regulator looks like it's never been changed and it has a 12v stereo in it. 🤷‍♂️ Also a 6v starter 🤦MY Electrical engineering background tells me something isn't right, but somehow it was working.. I'll see about that part # when I get home.
Dropped the head off today and he is supposed to dismantle it and tell me what he thinks it needs, I was hoping he would clean my carb but I guess I have to take it elsewhere 😑
 
Last edited:

bubba22349

Top Poster
Staff member
VIP
Supporter 2021
Supporter 2019
REDLINE 10K
Thank you for the great pictures! The above casting date codes for the head and block Decode as follows
The C1AE-6090-D this head has a date code of "2C28" that means that the head was cast at the Ford engine foundry on March 28, 1962. So this is a 1962 223 year model head.

The EBP-6015-F Design / Casting number is for a 1954 to 1959 223 bare cylinder block, the date code is "55C" this block was cast at the Ford engine foundry on March 5, 1955 making it a 1955 year model engine possibly original to your truck.

The above Vin Data Plate info Decodes as fallows.
F10D5A-29132
F10 = F100 1/2 Ton Conventional Cab with a Short Bed, 110 inch Wheel Base with a G.V.W. of 5000 Lbs. There were the standard base trim pickups and a custom cab option was also available on the 1955 F100's. A custom cab truck came with chrome Custom Cab door emblems and some other chrome features. I would need to see more pictures to ID the model trim. In 1955 Ford built a total of 124,842 F100 pickups & 11,198 F100 Panel's.
D = a 223 OHV 1V. (118 H.P. / 206 Lb. of Torque) Inline Six. 1955 was the first year that the 223 OHV Six was used in the Pickup's
5 = Year 1955
A = the trucks Ford Assembly Plant in Atlanta Ga.
29123 = Is the "Consecutive Unit Number" at the Atlanta, Ga. Ford Assembly Plant.

3= is the code for a regular 3 speed manual transmission
Rear Axle gear ratio = 3.92
Color U = Meadow Green the Ford paint code number is M-14283, PPG number is 40481. I think on Base models the grilles, parking lamps, and Wheels on the 1955 F-100s were all painted Snowshoe White. See Below for original color Paint examples on a 1955 Ford F100 'Custom Cab" Short 6.5 Ft. bed.
28G = ?
Production Code = "485C" don't know this exactly but it should be sometime in March 1955 since the engine block maybe original to the truck (cast on March 5th, 1955 it could be 18th or more likely the 28th I think the 4 has to be a miss stamped number. If you still had the 1955 head yet I think your truck from what i can see would be a very original example still.
 

Attachments

  • 001.jpg
    001.jpg
    46 KB · Views: 4
  • 002.jpg
    002.jpg
    54.9 KB · Views: 3
  • 003.jpg
    003.jpg
    40.8 KB · Views: 3
  • 004.jpg
    004.jpg
    41.7 KB · Views: 3

teggy87

Well-known member
Thanks bubba22349, I had speculated as much about the condition of the truck. The head was the biggest question. But it's good to know that I'm not the only one who thinks it's mostly original. I have registration from my grandfather going back to 1975, but I'm not sure where he got it from. My father was too little to know but was told that he never did anything to the engine so I was surprised to see it bored over so much.
My father cracked the head trying to drive it to work every day probably 25 years ago. So that's when it got the replacement. Been sitting mostly since then it's a terrible shade of ugly right now, but it keeps some of the rust away.
Is that your truck? It looks amazing.. something to look forward to I guess
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20211003_151449.jpg
    IMG_20211003_151449.jpg
    2.9 MB · Views: 7
  • IMG_20211004_080030.jpg
    IMG_20211004_080030.jpg
    6.1 MB · Views: 7

Bill56

Active member
I don't think the starter is going to much care if it is now getting 12 volts.
It might try to turn a little faster, which isn't a bad thing as they are usually kinda slow anyway.
It could get hot if it has to work longer to get it to start.
Best to keep it tuned up so it starts right away and doesn't have time to get hot. ;)

I expect the carb to be a Holley 1904.
Fairly simple to rebuild. Not a lot to it.
 

teggy87

Well-known member
I don't think the starter is going to much care if it is now getting 12 volts.
It might try to turn a little faster, which isn't a bad thing as they are usually kinda slow anyway.
It could get hot if it has to work longer to get it to start.
Best to keep it tuned up so it starts right away and doesn't have time to get hot. ;)

I expect the carb to be a Holley 1904.
Fairly simple to rebuild. Not a lot to it.
You nailed it, the starter is fast and I hope it will start on the first turn every single time without fail 🤣 I believe it is a Holley maybe 1904 I think I may rebuild it myself, I hate carbs. Last carb I touched lost a float bowl needle. I've had alot of luck drowning them in an ultrasonic cleaner.
 

bubba22349

Top Poster
Staff member
VIP
Supporter 2021
Supporter 2019
REDLINE 10K
No that isn't my Green truck I never had a 1955 F100 I only had the 1956 F100's (about 3 or 4 of them) and a F350, and a F500. My Dad did have a 55 F350 though that I drove for Construction jobs and a 56 F100 (wish that I could of got that one to keep) he bought new I got to go with him when he ordered it new years later I learned to drive in it. That 56 had the same equipment as yours the 223 with regular 3 speed trans and 3.92 rear axle gears it was a base model in Light Baby Blue that think was called Diamond Blue https://diecastsociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/AW290.jpg
That Die Cast model's a very close example of what it looked like however it had the black painted front bumper, the head lite trim rings were the polished stainless steel, with the Agent Silver Painted Hub Caps with Red Ford lettering, the hood had the standard chrome F100 emblems on the sides & the center emblem on front of hood. no side view mirrors, inside the only option was a heater, the standard bench seat had the vinyl check pattern, inside rear view mirror, gray cardboard kick panels and matching gray cardboard head liner, no radio, or turn signals and only a single tail / brake light on the drivers side, no rear bumper. had a spare tire under bed, my Dad also ordered it with the heavy duty Radiator and the the larger 6.70 X 15 black side wall tires. So with only three ordered options it was almost as basic a F100 as you could get. There are almost no original Inline 223 Six base models left these trucks being so popular usually get customized all the time with the higher trim level Chrome parts. It also looked something like the below picture but not sure of that color though, the last two pictures are of my old 1956 Car transport that I got in 1977 and had for 37 years, it also was originally built as a 223 Six with three speed. That's great that your 1955 is already converted to 12 volt system most of them got changed over long ago, and it dose make for a big improvement in how they start up and perform as a driver.
 

Attachments

  • 1956 Ford F100 Light Blue.jpg
    1956 Ford F100 Light Blue.jpg
    141.4 KB · Views: 5
  • CraigsList.Cars 046.JPG
    CraigsList.Cars 046.JPG
    496 KB · Views: 5
  • IMG_2442.JPG
    IMG_2442.JPG
    103.8 KB · Views: 5

bubba22349

Top Poster
Staff member
VIP
Supporter 2021
Supporter 2019
REDLINE 10K
You mentioned that you Dad cracked the head driving it everyday. You should check out that the blocks cooling passages are very clean inside or maybe even pull the engine and do a good cleaning of everthing you can even get a re ring kit fairly inexpensely in about the $220.00 to $320.00 range the lower price level includes a full engine gasket set, a set of rings, and set of rod bearings, plus you can get a custom kit to add main bearings and the any other parts if you wanted to overhaul the short block. You should also check out your Radator and flush it out at a minimum to be sure it's very clean inside and flows well if not it may need to be Rodded and don't forget to clean out the heater core too. Best of luck on your 55.
 

teggy87

Well-known member
Got the title and the head back yesterday. He cleaned it, and put in hardened valve seats and something else I can't recall. $350 🤨
I do intend to have the radiator cleaned, the heater core was leaking and that's why it was parked all those years ago. I'm not sure if he had it fixed but I intend to drop that off with the radiator. I don't wish to pull the engine. I am cleaning up the passages though as best as I can. And I'll flush it out forward and backwards before I fill it with antifreeze.

That is an awesome flatbed. Don't see that every day for sure. Not quite as many of those around anymore. You gonna put that mustang back on the road?

Head bolts, where do I get these? I'm afraid if I re use the old ones, they will break. A couple also had corrosion on them
 
Last edited:

manglass

Well-known member
Got the title and the head back yesterday. He cleaned it, and put in hardened valve seats and something else I can't recall. $350 🤨 I do intend to have the radiator cleaned, the heater core was leaking and that's why it was parked all those years ago. I'm not sure if he had it fixed but I intend to drop that off with the radiator. I don't wish to pull the engine. I am cleaning up the passages though as best as I can. And I'll flush it out forward and backwards before I fill it with antifreeze. That is an awesome flatbed. Don't see that every day for sure. Not quite as many of those around anymore. You gonna put that mustang back on the road? Head bolts, where do I get these? I'm afraid if I re use the old ones, they will break. A couple also had corrosion on them
I took a quick look, headbolts.com lists them but they are out of stock. I looked in my 1958 parts catalog and I believe the bolts you are looking for are part number B6A 6066-A. The size in the catalog is listed as 7/16"-14 x 4.07". These are the same part number and size as the 6 shorter Y-block head bolts. I could not find them N.O.S. anywhere but you might try Bill (Number Dummy) at ford-trucks.com, he has much greater resources than I do. John Mummert's site http://www.ford-y-block.com/ lists an ARP set for the Y-block (154-HBK). You might contact ARP directly, if nothing else they might sell you 16 of the shorter bolts individually.

Lou Manglass
 

mystere

New member
Good to read that you got your head back with upgraded hardened seats. My 59 223 six is original. My late dad bought it new in Southern California. It has a retrofitted PCV Valve per California Smog mandate in 1966. The 223 six is one durable engine. Mine has over 228,000 miles on it with no overhaul, but needs it badly. My late dad and I used Gunk Motorflush every time we changed the oil and filter to clean the sludge buildup before pouring in fresh oil and zinc additive (STP). A rebuilder can rebuild your starter to work with a 12 volt system if you decide to have it upgraded. If it has a generator, it likely got upgraded to a 1956 to 1962 12 volt electrical system.
 

63Boxtop

Active member
A bit late to the party but those tubes are the OEM oil sending and return lines. The rear one (input) has the O ring seal the forward one (return) has no seal at the bottom. If you have not already I would suggest pulling out the cotter pin at one end of the rocker tube so you can remove a rocker and check the shaft for wear. Virtually all the wear occurs on the bottom half of the shaft....you can't see it till you pull one off though you may feel it if you can move the rocker up and down a small amount on the shaft. Photo shows the forward rocker removed and notice the wear on the shaft. I found some of the oil delivery holes to be partial plugged with oil sludge. The bushings in the rockers did not show as much wear visually and fit good on the non-worn area of the shaft. After much searching I did find an complete OEM re-manufactured assembly at Green Sales and after I put the word out a this and one other forum their stock of 11 quickly sold out. Mine is the later zero lash rockers while yours is the earlier version. There are soft metal plugs in each end of the shaft and you could pull these out for cleaning...as long as you have replacements in hand.....I have seen these available. If you need a new shaft you are going to have a search on your hands but I think the earlier rocker version is more common than the zero lash.
 

Attachments

  • 62AB4574-9FB2-4CBA-B5D0-51A13D6E305D.jpeg
    62AB4574-9FB2-4CBA-B5D0-51A13D6E305D.jpeg
    812.7 KB · Views: 3

mystere

New member
I imagine some of the worn shafts can be welded up and reground to oem specifications if necessary. I've known about various engine shafts being machined and welded up to be reground to oem specs. I hope these parts can be redone to specs or that there are some parts still being made for replacements. Once the engine is completely rebuilt, it pays to desludge the engine every time the oil and filter are changed. That will help keep the passages clear. Someone also mentioned on either this forum or a GM forum "Stove Bolt" that PCV Valve retrofits helped keep engines from building up sludge deposits. As I had mentioned earlier, my late dad got forced to retrofit the 223 six in 1966 with a PCV retrofit kit per a California smog control mandate issued. I did some research to find out what factory PCV Valve was used on the 1961-64 California model 223 six, as 61 and later vehicles sold in certain parts of California were required to be sold new with PCV systems before California issued a state wide mandate to retrofit all post WW2 vehicles not originally equipped with PCV systems with state approved universal PCV retrofit kits to renew vehicle registration for 1967 and later. My dad bought a 1962 Rambler Classic sedan brand new with the California mandated factory PCV Valve system. It turns out the PCV Valve for the 6 cylinder 1961-62 Rambler 196 cast iron OHV six and the L head 6 engines are the same as the one Ford used on its 6 cylinder engines from 1961-64. My spare vacuum port on the 223 six intake manifold became the port used for the retrofit PCV Valve. If I score a new Offenhauser valve cover for my 223 six, I'll pull the old vent tube, put a freeze plug drilled and fitted with a PCV fitting and use it to route fumes back into the intake manifold to be burned further. If a new cover is not available, I'll use the current setup, but remove the draft tube and plug the hole with a freeze plug. In either case, I will install a new factory PCV valve and new PCV Vent fittings where it was punched on the old valve cover. It's nice not getting unburned fumes into the cab with the PCV Valve feeding the fumes back into the engine instead. Those who use new crate engines or later model engines pulled from parts trucks don't get the fumes back into the cab.
 

63Boxtop

Active member
With the right equipment and some machining skills it wouldn’t be hard to fab up a shaft. It was the route I was pursuing until I found the OEM assembly for $75. NOS rockers were not to hard to source....it’s the shaft that seems to be made of unobtainium. I think these shafts are some type of chrome moly alloy....I hadn’t got into it that deep yet.

The engine seemed to run fine with the worn shaft but I could see it was oiling poorly due to sludge and the loose tolerances created by the wear. The wear was very even along the shaft. It was hard to keep all the rockers in adjustment....there would always be a few that would be out. It still ran but I am sure the wear just accelerated.
 
Last edited:
Top